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Posts from the ‘Royal Copenhagen’ Category

Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen Pattern 719

Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen Pattern 719

Design or Pattern number 719 by Nils Thorsson for Royal Copenhagen/Aluminia is one of the most recognised and popular designs from the BACA series in the 1960s.

The design is such a beautifully complex mixture of subtle colours, line patterns and textures – and the design contains elements which don’t reveal themselves immediately to the viewer.

On most pieces the design consists of outlined or framed elements joined together with lines and repeat patterns. Inside the framed components are designs of fish – sometimes a repeat pattern, sometimes a single fish.

Other elements appear to be floral – or perhaps they are seaweed or other aquatic flora. The more you study one of these pieces, the more the design reveals itself to you.

In addition to the design, the complex nature of the glazes which Nils developed for the BACA series, means that each piece turned out slightly different when fired in the kiln – adding to the “handmade” appearance of each piece.

 

Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen Pattern 719

Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen Pattern 719

Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen Pattern 719

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Ellen Malmer, Royal Copenhagen Pattern 627

I recently discovered a design by Ellen Malmer for the BACA series at Royal Copenhagen I haven’t come across previously.

I have written about the designs by Ellen Malmer previously HERE, and the story of the BACA series HERE if you are unfamiliar with either.

This simple and bold pattern is number 627, and it is placed onto form 3587 – a wide flat bowl in this case.

I love the bold simplicity of this design, and the contrast of the white background, dark brown outline and orange peel texture of the caramel coloured main design. To me it appears to be a simplified design of apples or pears cut in half, and repeated around the form.

I haven’t been able to find any other forms where this pattern has been used, but if you know of any I would love to hear from you.

Ellen Malmer 627, Royal Copenhagen Read more

Royal Copenhagen Fredensborg 937

Royal Copenhagen 937

Royal Copenhagen Fredendsborg (design no. 937) is a beautiful plain cream coloured porcelain design, with a luxurious gold trim.

It is a design by Thorkild Ohlsen who designed the famous Fensmark and Quaking Grass Designs I have posted about previously.

The pieces in this are the same shape and size and colour as Fensmark and Quaking Grass, but it always amazes me how a change of colour and pattern (or in this case no pattern) can transform a form.

The glaze on this series (937) has a luxurious clotted cream colour, with an equally luxuriant gold trim on the pieces.

Simple, elegant and timeless.

Royal Copenhagen, Design 937, Fredensborg

Royal Copenhagen, Design 937, Fredensborg

Royal Copenhagen, Design 937, Fredensborg

Royal Copenhagen, Design 937, Fredensborg

Royal Copenhagen, Design 937, Fredensborg

Royal Copenhagen, Design 937, Fredensborg

Royal Copenhagen, Design 937, Fredensborg

Royal Copenhagen, Design 937, Fredensborg

Royal Copenhagen, Design 937, Fredensborg

Royal Copenhagen, Design 937, Fredensborg

Royal Copenhagen, Design 937, Fredensborg Stamp

Royal Copenhagen, Design 937, Fredensborg Stamp on shape 9481

Royal Copenhagen “Annette”

Royal Copenhagen Annette

This stunning and now quite rare pattern was designed by Berte Jessen in the 1960’s for Aluminia//Royal Copenhagen. It is a hard design to find, and if you are a lover of mid 20th Century design, well worth grabbing hold of if you come across it.

It has to be one of the most beautiful designs I have come across by Berte. It consists of a simple daisy motif medallion either by itself or repeated around the form. The blue glaze is wonderfully textured and has blue hues which vary from aquamarine to a deep cobalt blue with an overall hint of violet. I love the texture and depth of colour she manages to get in her designs, combined with preciseness and flair.

The pattern is called “Annette” and each piece has slight variations in colour and texture, accentuating the handmade feel of the wares.

It is so beautiful to the touch as well. It is from the very important “Tenera” series I have written about previously.

Royal Copenhagen Annette

Royal Copenhagen Annette Tea Cup, Saucer, Plate

Royal Copenhagen Annette

Royal Copenhagen Annette (plate)

Royal Copenhagen Annette

Royal Copenhagen Annette (saucer)

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Aluminia Morgenfrue

Aluminia Royal Copenhagen Morgenfrue/Calendula

This pattern is called Calendula (or Morgenfrue) and was produced by Aluminia Royal Copenhagen faience from 1934 to 1967, such was its popularity and timeless qualities. The design is by the iconic designer and potter NILS THORSSON.

What I like about this design is the great combination of colours and the simple orange flower motif (the Calendula).

The base colour is a lovely pale cream which is complimented by the simple orange flower, lovely woven texture rims, and dark green detailing on the rims and leaves.

Aluminia had been established in Copenhagen in 1863. In 1882, the owners of Aluminia purchased the Royal Copenhagen porcelain factory. From 1901-1928 Alumina had a renewed era of success under Chairman Joachim (1870-1943) and Harald Slott-Møller (1864-1937).

In 1928 Nils Thorsson took the factory to its new and final era before closing in 1969,  although Royal Copenhagen continued to use the name of Alumina for some of its ware for a time afterward. Nils Thorsson continued to work for Royal Copenhagen into the 1970s.

Aluminia Morgenfrue Bowl

Aluminia Morgenfrue Bowl

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Royal Copenhagen Quaking Grass

Royal Copenhagen Quaking Grass

When designing Quaking Grass, (pattern number 884) Thorkild Ohlsen developed beautiful and subtle porcelain forms with elegant lines, and perfect proportions. This was combined with Art Nouveau and Oriental-inspired, hand-painted botanical elements in patterns that are timeless and elegant.

The forms designed for this service were to be used on many dinnerware designs that followed including the equally admired “Fensmark”.

Quaking Grass was produced from the early-30’s until approximately 1960, as it simply did not go out of style.

Quaking Grass derives it name from an early-19th century botanical illustration of the ‘Doxia’ plant, more-commonly known as ‘Quaking Grass’. This plant is common in the Scandinavian region, and is highly regarded for its golden “Japanese lantern” style seed pods that hang from long stems that ‘quake’ with the slightest breeze, giving each plant a charming quality that makes a field of Doxia dance with lively energy.

Ohlsen captured the delicacy and movement of this beautiful plant, in beautifully and delicately rendered leaves and stems of sage green, surmounted by seed pods rendered in gold. Each spray of Doxia is slightly different, demonstrating the skill of the painters of this ware.

This work was produced by painters who also painted the famous Danish botanical paintings on the illustrious ‘Flora Danica’ porcelain service produced by Royal Copenhagen The botanical motif is restricted to small central areas and sides of the individual plates and serving pieces, allowing the beautiful pale cream color of the porcelain to serve as the primary decorative element.

‘Quaking Grass’ was primarily sold in Europe and the United Kingdom, and was extremely expensive when new, with a full dinner service for 14 with serving pieces selling for nearly $5,000 in the Late-1950’s–an astronomical sum at a time when a service for 12 of Noritake, sold for around $150.00

Royal Copenhagen Quaking Grass

Royal Copenhagen Quaking Grass

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Royal Copenhagen Fensmark

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark

Thorkild Ohlsen (1890-1973) was a Danish landscape painter and porcelain designer who produced a number of significant porcelain dinner services for Royal Copenhagen beginning in the early 1930’s.

Ohlsen was originally employed by Royal Copenhagen Porcelain in 1908, and was an important collaborator of Nils Thorsson. He continued to paint and exhibit his work during his lifetime.

At Royal Copenhagen he worked with both modeling and decoration, especially over-and underglaze painting, and he participated in the development of glazes. In his early work, a series of crackle ware from 1920 , is the decoration of iron red and gold, usually with botanical motifs.

I think one of the most elegant dinnerware ranges he designed was “Fensmark” c1930s– named after a town in Denmark of the same name. It is also known by its pattern number “1010”. It was in production for decades and the forms were used on a number of dinnerware series.

 

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Trio

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Trio

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Milk Jug

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Milk Jug

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Serving Tureen

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Serving Tureen

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Bowl

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Bowl

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Milk Jug

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Soup Plate

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Candle Holders

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Candle Holders

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Teapot

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Teapot

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Serving Plate

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Serving Plate

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Ellen Malmer, Royal Copenhagen

Ellen Malmer, Royal Copenhagen 1965-1988

Ellen Malmer ( b1942 – ) is another of the great designers and artists who worked for Royal Copenhagen at the height of its popularity in the mid to late twentieth century. She was part of the group working with Nils Thorsson producing the now iconic Baca and Tenera series for Aluminia/Royal Copenhagen.

She trained at the Design School in Copenhagen and started with Royal Copenhagen as a designer in 1965 working there until 1988, primarily with Fajance ware. After leaving Royal Copenhagen she has worked in her own right as an Artist in the fields of textiles and collage/painting.

Each Designer who worked with fajance ware at Royal Copenhagen became known for their unique style of design, decoration, use of colour, and motifs – and the work of Ellen Malmer is no exception.

We often see only the most popular Baca and Tenera designs these days by Ellen due to their higher production, but they represent only a small range of her designs. I have tried to capture a wide cross section of her designs in the images below.

I really like the graphic and textural qualities of her designs, along with her subtle use of tone and colour. If I had to pick a favourite it would be the Nucella design dinnerware in blue. The shapes for this series were designed by Inge-Lise Kofoed and Leif Lautrup-Larsen, and the Pattern design by Ellen Malmer in 1966.

Royal Copenhagen, Ellen Malmer Pattern 962

Royal Copenhagen, Ellen Malmer Pattern 962

Ellen Malmer, Royal Copenhagen Pattern 962

Ellen Malmer, Royal Copenhagen Pattern 962

Ellen Malmer, Royal Copenhagen Pattern 617

Ellen Malmer, Royal Copenhagen Pattern 617

Ellen Malmer Vase Pattern 661, Royal Copenhagen

Ellen Malmer Vase Pattern 661, Royal Copenhagen. Image via Pinterest.

Ellen Malmer, Royal Copenhagen, Pattern 657

Ellen Malmer, Royal Copenhagen, Pattern 657, Image via Pinterest.

Royal Copenhagen Pattern 635 - Design Ellen Malmer

Royal Copenhagen Pattern 635 – Design Ellen Malmer

Royal Copenhagen Pattern 953 Ellen Malmer

Royal Copenhagen Pattern 953 Ellen Malmer

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