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Posts tagged ‘Art Deco’

Royal Doulton “Kay”, c1914

This lovely Art Deco design is from Royal Doulton c1914 from their “D” series of dinnerware.

Called “Kay” the design features a charming hand painted design in an Art Deco style, in blue overglaze on plain creamware//earthenware.

Pieces in this design don’t seem to have survived well if used, as the eathenware or “creamware” base is quite “soft”, and easily prone to chipping, crazing, cracking etc. However considering the year this was released, at the start of World War 1, industry would have been facing some very tough times.

You can work out the production dates from these “D” series wares from Doulton 1899 to 1964 on the link here

Royal Doulton Kay 1914

Royal Doulton Kay 1914

Royal Doulton Kay 1914

Royal Doulton Kay 1914

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Eva Zeisel “Ceylon”

It is not well known that Eva Zeisel (1906- 2011) – more known now as an iconic America designer, in her youth was an important emerging designer in West Germany.

The very striking design in this post by Eva is called “Ceylon” and was design by her at Schramberger, and later developed further at Carstens. It appears to be now very rare.

Eva Zeisel was born Eva Stricker into a Jewish family in Budapest, where she studied painting at the Royal Academy of Art from 1923 -24 and sold some of her pottery designs at open air markets.

Around 1925 she was employed by Schramberger Majolikafabrik as in the Black Forest, as their chief designer. Here she produced over 200 designs, many of which weren’t well documented. Many of them though stayed in production long after she left Schramberger. Some of them have been reissued by MoMA in New York, the Brooklyn Museum and others.

In 1930, she moved to Berlin, where she worked  briefly for Carstens Lübeck, then for about 18 months at Carstens-Hirschau and also as an independent designer.

Eva designed several coffee and tea sets including this Ceylon for Carstens-Hirschau.

The tea service “Ceylon” was released in 1933, and produced until about 1935 with at least 4 documented patterns. The design for “Ceylon” was obviously designed earlier by Eva though, as there are a number of pieces you can find with the Schramberger Ceylon stamp like the one in this post.

I love the sugar bowl in the first image below – it looks like something of a cross between Bauhaus, Cubism and Futurism.

The influential Bauhaus and the emerging Modernist movement must have been quite an influence on Eva at the time. You will notice some subtle differences between the larger plate design (above) and the smaller plate design (below).  I would love to see what the cups and tea/coffee pots from this service looked like – but havent been able to locate any images.

Carstens-Hirschau closed production in 1956, while the Schramberg facilities closed in the late 1980s.

Some of information above has been sourced from the informative Spritzdekor website here: 

Eva Zeisel "Ceylon", Schramberger

Eva Zeisel “Ceylon”, Schramberger

Eva Zeisel "Ceylon", Schramberger

Eva Zeisel “Ceylon”, Schramberger

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Royal Doulton “Iris”

Royal Doulton “Iris” V1346

Sometimes there are designs which you come across which are simply blindingly beautiful, and this happened   when I saw this design as a set for the first time.

I don’t collect or buy a lot of Royal Doulton, but I do really like some of their series from the first half of the 20th Century, in particular from the Art Deco Era.

This is the era in which Doulton created some outstanding designs which were popular for decades to follow.

The pattern is  “Iris” V1346, which was manufactured between 1937 and 1940 – officially not in the Art Deco Era – but such an archetypal art deco design with its design of an Iris. The angles and forms are also an identifier of the Art Deco era.

The shapes I think are actually very similar to Royal Copenhagen of the same period – like Fensmark and Quaking Grass.

The hand painting on this set is exquisite, as is the use of colour and line. Each piece is like a work of art and it’s fascinating to see how it all fits together – e.g. when the cup is on the plate how the shapes and design relate to each other so well.

 

Royal Doulton Iris Royal Doulton Iris Royal Doulton Iris Read more

Royal Doulton “Rosslyn”

Royal Doulton “Rosslyn” D5399

After 80+ years Royal Doulton Rosslyn is still a very popular design in Australia.  It is probably because it was so popular in its period – (designed in 1933 but produced for years) as a wedding gift – that many people grew up with either their mother or grandmother having at least a few pieces of the set, if not the whole thing. In this era dinner sets were huge, and usually consisted of over 100 pieces.

What I like about the Rosslyn pattern is its Art Deco look with the stylised floral motif combined which is combined with black line work on a cream coloured glaze. The floral design isn’t over fussy, and has an almost Japanese quality about it.

The black line work also reminds me of the Architecture of that period too and of the Californian Bungalow style (1920-1939) with its black timber work staining in each room (“Japaning” as it was called).

There was also a version of this which instead of the black outline, had an orange outline – but to me that version does not work. The orange line looks lost on the design, which loses its impact because of it.

Below are some images of pieces in this design which have passed through my hands. Royal Doulton Rosslyn Royal Doulton Rosslyn Royal Doulton Rosslyn Read more

Aluminia Morgenfrue

Aluminia Royal Copenhagen Morgenfrue/Calendula

This pattern is called Calendula (or Morgenfrue) and was produced by Aluminia Royal Copenhagen faience from 1934 to 1967, such was its popularity and timeless qualities. The design is by the iconic designer and potter NILS THORSSON.

What I like about this design is the great combination of colours and the simple orange flower motif (the Calendula).

The base colour is a lovely pale cream which is complimented by the simple orange flower, lovely woven texture rims, and dark green detailing on the rims and leaves.

Aluminia had been established in Copenhagen in 1863. In 1882, the owners of Aluminia purchased the Royal Copenhagen porcelain factory. From 1901-1928 Alumina had a renewed era of success under Chairman Joachim (1870-1943) and Harald Slott-Møller (1864-1937).

In 1928 Nils Thorsson took the factory to its new and final era before closing in 1969,  although Royal Copenhagen continued to use the name of Alumina for some of its ware for a time afterward. Nils Thorsson continued to work for Royal Copenhagen into the 1970s.

Aluminia Morgenfrue Bowl

Aluminia Morgenfrue Bowl

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Royal Copenhagen Quaking Grass

Royal Copenhagen Quaking Grass

When designing Quaking Grass, (pattern number 884) Thorkild Ohlsen developed beautiful and subtle porcelain forms with elegant lines, and perfect proportions. This was combined with Art Nouveau and Oriental-inspired, hand-painted botanical elements in patterns that are timeless and elegant.

The forms designed for this service were to be used on many dinnerware designs that followed including the equally admired “Fensmark”.

Quaking Grass was produced from the early-30’s until approximately 1960, as it simply did not go out of style.

Quaking Grass derives it name from an early-19th century botanical illustration of the ‘Doxia’ plant, more-commonly known as ‘Quaking Grass’. This plant is common in the Scandinavian region, and is highly regarded for its golden “Japanese lantern” style seed pods that hang from long stems that ‘quake’ with the slightest breeze, giving each plant a charming quality that makes a field of Doxia dance with lively energy.

Ohlsen captured the delicacy and movement of this beautiful plant, in beautifully and delicately rendered leaves and stems of sage green, surmounted by seed pods rendered in gold. Each spray of Doxia is slightly different, demonstrating the skill of the painters of this ware.

This work was produced by painters who also painted the famous Danish botanical paintings on the illustrious ‘Flora Danica’ porcelain service produced by Royal Copenhagen The botanical motif is restricted to small central areas and sides of the individual plates and serving pieces, allowing the beautiful pale cream color of the porcelain to serve as the primary decorative element.

‘Quaking Grass’ was primarily sold in Europe and the United Kingdom, and was extremely expensive when new, with a full dinner service for 14 with serving pieces selling for nearly $5,000 in the Late-1950’s–an astronomical sum at a time when a service for 12 of Noritake, sold for around $150.00

Royal Copenhagen Quaking Grass

Royal Copenhagen Quaking Grass

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Royal Copenhagen Fensmark

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark

Thorkild Ohlsen (1890-1973) was a Danish landscape painter and porcelain designer who produced a number of significant porcelain dinner services for Royal Copenhagen beginning in the early 1930’s.

Ohlsen was originally employed by Royal Copenhagen Porcelain in 1908, and was an important collaborator of Nils Thorsson. He continued to paint and exhibit his work during his lifetime.

At Royal Copenhagen he worked with both modeling and decoration, especially over-and underglaze painting, and he participated in the development of glazes. In his early work, a series of crackle ware from 1920 , is the decoration of iron red and gold, usually with botanical motifs.

I think one of the most elegant dinnerware ranges he designed was “Fensmark” c1930s– named after a town in Denmark of the same name. It is also known by its pattern number “1010”. It was in production for decades and the forms were used on a number of dinnerware series.

 

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Trio

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Trio

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Milk Jug

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Milk Jug

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Serving Tureen

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Serving Tureen

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Bowl

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Bowl

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Milk Jug

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Soup Plate

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Candle Holders

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Candle Holders

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Teapot

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Teapot

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Serving Plate

Royal Copenhagen Fensmark Serving Plate

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Denby Electric Blue

Denby – Danesby Electric Blue 1924, U.K.

In 1924-5 Bourne-Denby as the British company was then known, introduced a decorative line called “Danesby Ware” of which the “Electric Blue” range was one of the outstanding and most popular lines. The Electric Blue glaze captured a new age of optimism and cheerfulness coming out of years of darkness during WW1

Originally inspired by the shapes of an Aladdin’s lamp, the outstanding feature of this range was the beautiful blue streaky and high gloss glaze. It was produced well into the 1930’s, and is still popular amongst collectors today.

Being stoneware it has lasted incredibly well, and the pieces I have photographed here are in superb condition. You can often fine Electric Blue in online stores in the U.K., and in Canada.  The vase forms pictured here are probably the ones you will find most often – but there are some beautiful large jug forms which are much harder (and more expensive) to find.

They are such classical, elegant and beautiful shapes. Read more