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Posts tagged ‘IHQ’

Palshus Denmark

Palshus Denmark

Palshus Pottery was founded by husband and wife team Per Linnemann-Schmidt and Annelise Linnemann-Schmidt in 1947 in the town of Sengløse just west of Copenhagen, Denmark.

Per came from a strong artistic background, having graduated from the Royal Academy of Art in Copenhagen in 1931 and subsequent work as a sculptor.

The studio name is an acronym of P(er),(A)nnelise  (L)innemann, (S)chmidt and HUS (house).

The first items to be produced at Palshus were commercial wares in collaboration with Jens Quistgaard – being “Cherry Heering” Barware/Ashtrays for the Peter Herring Company, which they produced in very large numbers.

The early studio pieces from the studio were precise and minimalist in nature, with beautifully silken, matte haresfur glazes – mostly in subtle tones of either brown, blue, green or cream. The simple glazes and forms were a combination of Japanese and Scandinavian influences. Per was self taught in glaze technology and perfected these now iconic Palshus haresfur glazes. Per also often designed and drafted many of the forms and glazes and worked with other craftsmen and Annelise to realise the pieces.

Palshus Haresfur Glaze Bowl

Palshus Haresfur Glaze Bowl

Palshus Haresfur Glaze Bowl

 

At Palshus the 1960s saw a change in style with the use of chamotte (textured clay) along with impressed/sgrafitto patterns, used in conjunction with more roughly textured,  glossy glazes.

Much of the output of Palshus was sold through Den Permanente in Copenhagen – as was the work of many important potters, craftsmen and artists at this time.

Palshus pottery is well marked with “Palshus Denmark” along with an inscribed number or number letter combination (which I believe is the form/shape number), and often a glaze or oxide colour number which is painted (rather than inscribed) on the base as a number or alpha-numerical code.

It will also have either Per’s or Annelise’s (or both) cyphers (PLS, ALS, APLS)….. but in the 1950s and 1960s several talented artists, sculptors and designers also worked at Palshus – including Kjeld Jorden (figurines), Jens Quistgaard, Billy Eberlein and Hugo de Soto (Artist/Painter).

The pottery closed in 1972, three years after the sad death of Annelise in a car accident at the age of 51. Per and Annelise had three children and five grandchildren including the ceramic artist/sculptor Annelise Linnemann-Schmidt (named after her grandmother) now back in Denmark after studying and working in the UK for several years.

 

Palshus Haresfur Glaze Bowl

Palshus Haresfur Glaze Bowl Base

Palshus Chamotte Vessel

Palshus Chamotte Vessel with glossy, textured glaze

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Jens Quistgaard Ceramic & Rosewood Humidors, Kronjyden Nissen

Jens Quistgaard, Ceramic & Rosewood Humidors

Apart from the dinnerware designs Jens Quistgaard created in the 1960s and 1970s for Kronyjden Nissen he created a series of beautiful ceramic/rosewood accessories for cigarettes, smoking and cigars.

While this might seem odd to use these days, let’s not forget this was at a time when smoking was seen as a normal part of daily life, and often portrayed as aspirational.

The pieces he created included humidors, ashtrays, cigarette jars etc. They were pieces made to be proudly displayed as luxury items.

The glazes used were mostly from the azure and umber dinnerware series, combined with the most beautifully crafted and sculpted rosewood lids on many of the pieces which Quistgaard also designed.

These designs  also complimented a now iconic series designed by Quistgaard known as the “Rare Wood Table Top Collection” of trays, bowls, ice buckets, pepper mills for Dansk Designs in 1961.

Lettering was used on the ceramic surfaces as a decorative technique to stunning effect, with a repeated word embossed on to the clay body, accentuating the beauty of the glaze and form.

It is not often you find wood and clay combined well – but Quistgaard did so to perfection in these designs.

Below are some of the pieces I have come across, but there are several more designs in this series which is now very hard to find, and keenly sought by design collectors.

Jens Quistgaard, Cigar Humidor, Kronjyden Nissen

Jens Quistgaard, Cigar Humidor, Kronjyden Nissen

Jens Quistgaard, Cigar Humidor, Kronjyden Nissen

Jens Quistgaard, Cigar Humidor, Kronjyden Nissen – Top View

Jens Quistgaard, Ashtray, Kronjyden Nissen

Jens Quistgaard, Ashtray, Kronjyden Nissen

Jens Quistgaard, Ashtray, Kronjyden Nissen

Jens Quistgaard, Ashtray, Kronjyden Nissen

Jens Quistgaard, Cigarette Jar, Kronjyden Nissen

Jens Quistgaard, Cigarette Jar, Kronjyden Nissen

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Jens Quistgaard “Rune” Design, Kronjyden Nissen

Jens Quistgaard “Rune”, Kronjyden Nissen

Another of the great stoneware designs by Jens Quistgaard for Danish maker Kronjyden Nissen in the 1960s.

This design is called “Rune”, and the motifs on the design appears to be based upon or give an impression of early Runes (turned on their side) which were which were used to write various Germanic/Scandinavian languages before the adoption of the Latin alphabet.

Again it is a stoneware dinner service, this time with a smooth semi matte glaze with lovely pale olive green to ochre colours on the rims and edges. Again the brass rattan wrapped handles on some of the pieces add to the feel of being hand-crafted.

Rune Design Cup, Saucer, Plate, Jens Quistgaard for Kronjyden Nissen

Rune Design Cup, Saucer, Plate, Jens Quistgaard for Kronjyden Nissen

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