Skip to content

Soholm Denmark, 2 Sunflower Designs

Soholm Denmark, Sunflower Designs

As often happens when researching ceramics, I come across 2 or more different series by the same producer with the same name – but very different in style and appearance.

The first vase pictured below is a Soholm Denmark Solsikke (Sunflower) Design vase on form no. 2036 (which is normally seen with the Soholm Burgundia pattern).

Its production dates to around 1958. It is now quite a rare design. Holm Sorensen is attributed to the form design and Svend Aage Jensen to the decor. Both the stylish form and the smart graphic design elements are immediately identifiable as designs of the 1950s.

Soholm Sunflower Vase Sorensen/Jensen

Soholm Sunflower Vase Sorensen/Jensen

Soholm Sunflower Vase Sorensen/Jensen

Soholm Sunflower Vase Sorensen/Jensen

Soholm Sunflower Vase Sorensen/Jensen

Soholm Sunflower Vase Sorensen/Jensen

Soholm Sunflower Vase Sorensen/Jensen

Soholm Sunflower Vase Sorensen/Jensen

The next images are from a series at Soholm which has the same name, by Einar Johansen, and which was produced between 1966 and 1968. This series as a more rustic feel about it, and more “earthy” tones – again reflecting a different era of “back to nature” and the handmade. Read more

Royal Copenhagen “Annette”

Royal Copenhagen Annette

This stunning and now quite rare pattern was designed by Berte Jessen in the 1960’s for Aluminia//Royal Copenhagen. It is a hard design to find, and if you are a lover of mid 20th Century design, well worth grabbing hold of if you come across it.

It has to be one of the most beautiful designs I have come across by Berte. It consists of a simple daisy motif medallion either by itself or repeated around the form. The blue glaze is wonderfully textured and has blue hues which vary from aquamarine to a deep cobalt blue with an overall hint of violet. I love the texture and depth of colour she manages to get in her designs, combined with preciseness and flair.

The pattern is called “Annette” and each piece has slight variations in colour and texture, accentuating the handmade feel of the wares.

It is so beautiful to the touch as well. It is from the very important “Tenera” series I have written about previously.

Royal Copenhagen Annette

Royal Copenhagen Annette Tea Cup, Saucer, Plate

Royal Copenhagen Annette

Royal Copenhagen Annette (plate)

Royal Copenhagen Annette

Royal Copenhagen Annette (saucer)

Read more

Figgjo Norway, Market Design

Figgjo Norway, Market

Figgjo Norway, “Market” was designed in 1963 by Turi Gramstad Oliver, straight after she had designed Lotte. Each shape of the Market series features a different scene of characters at food markets dressed in folk style costumes.

The colours are hues of green and yellow on a white ground. It was in production from 1966-1980.

In its era, Market was as popular as the Lotte design, but the most admired design of the two now, 60 years or so later, seems to be Lotte. Both Lotte and Market have a similar look and feel to them with their quirky and delightful characters, costumes and settings.

Figgjo "Market" Design Cups

The design on every form is different, as is the case with Lotte. I haven’t yet come across a complete list of the forms in these series, but I continue to find a shapes that are new to me. Figgjo of this era was exported worldwide in large numbers – and especially to Australia, the U.S. and Canada where designs such as Market and Lotte are still very popular on the secondary market – but now to a whole new generation. Read more

Figgjo Annemarie

Figgjo Norway, Annemarie

Kirsten Selmer Medgård designed the decor of Annemarie which was produced between 1971 and 1977. The form designers were Jørg Lion Nilsen and Ragnar Grimsrud who designed many of the forms for Figgjo in this era.

The pieces from the Kirsten Dekor series are typified by their bright, bold and colourful “flat” floral designs – but it seems the designs are much harder to find that Turi design pieces – perhaps made in smaller number due to the popularity of series like Lotte and Market.

Kirsten also design the stunning “Saturn” design for Figgjo which seems to be incredibly rare. It has equally bright, bold graphics in her distinctly “flat graphics” style – this time in stunning blue hues.

Figgjo AnneMarie

Figgjo AnneMarie

Figgjo AnneMarie

Figgjo AnneMarie

Figgjo AnneMarie

Figgjo AnneMarie

Figgjo AnneMarie

Figgjo AnneMarie

Figgjo AnneMarie

Figgjo AnneMarie Backstamp

Read more

Denby Potter’s Wheel

Denby Potters Wheel

Denby “POTTERS WHEEL”  was designed by David Yorath, 1973.

The forms for this dinnerware were actually designed by Gill Pemberton in her Bokhara series, and given a new life with David’s pattern & colours.

Potter’s Wheel was produced between 1974 and 1987. It has a simple otameal and iron oxide brown glaze and  simple pattern of concentric circles.

There are varations in the intensity of the colours much like other Denby stoneware.

The centre area of the plates was glazed in either a rust, yellow, green or blue colour (but finding a plate other than in rust colour is very rare these days)

Denby Potter's Wheel

Denby Potter’s Wheel

Denby Potter's Wheel Plate

Denby Potter’s Wheel Plate

Denby Potter's Wheel

Denby Potter’s Wheel Bowl

Denby Potter's Wheel Plates

Denby Potter’s Wheel Plates

Denby Potter's Wheel

Denby Potter’s Wheel

Denby Potter's Wheel Colours

Denby Potter’s Wheel Colours

There was also a range of giftware designed to match this set which I really like. Each piece is different because they were hand-painted.  The range seems to consist of vases, jardinieres, and small bowls. I really like the texture and finish of these pieces and their design is timeless.  David also made a number of one off pieces in similar colour-ways to these. Read more

Beswick Zorba

Beswick Zorba 1960s

The pattern “Zorba” was designed by Graham Tongue in the late 1960’s at Beswick.

It also comes in a pale Olive Green colour, but this “mission brown” colour brings out the pattern much better I think. I like the shapes of the pieces in this range too – especially the cups.

Beswick also made some other great retro designs during this period including “Apollo” and “Orbit” – All very space age retro.

Royal Doulton took over the Beswick factory in 1969 and  in 1975 Graham Tongue became the head modeller at the Beswick and added many new characters to their range of Figurines in the 1980’s.

The Beswick factory closed in 2003 and much of the Royal Doulton production was moved overseas, because it was no longer commercially viable.

Beswick Zorba

Beswick Zorba

Beswick Zorba Coffee Pot

Beswick Zorba Coffee Pot

Beswick Zorba

Beswick Zorba

Read more

Royal Doulton “Basque”

Royal Doulton Basque

This oh so seventies looking design was produced at the Lambeth factory of Doulton between 1974 and 1981.

Going by the number of pieces from the set for sale on various online shops still, it must have been a very popular pattern.

Its easy to see the design is classic seventies even without knowing much about it.

It has the loveliest dark chocolate brown coloured glaze- a colour often called “mission brown” in its day when it was often used as a paint trim colour in houses.

The design consists of a subtle design of country flowers in a basket.  The glaze has a great sheen and smoothness to it as well.
I like the shape of the pieces too, solid but with rounded edges and with nice proportions – quintessentially British.

Being stoneware it is very tough as well. I have seen photographs of several other patterns by Doulton using this form as well, but Basque stands out from the others.

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque Mark

Royal Doulton Basque Mark

Poole Cameo Celadon

Poole Cameo Celadon, 1950s and 1960s.

Firstly a brief background about Poole from a site which is no longer up (Poole Pottery.org)

  • “Poole Pottery was established in 1873 by Jesse Carter. In the 1920’s, Jesse Carter went into partnership with Harold Stabler and John Adams, forming a company known as “Carter Stabler Adams” and this company in turn, eventually became known as Poole Pottery. Production continued at the Poole Quayside factory until 1999, when it moved to Sopers Lane. The factory closed in 2006, but it has recently restarted production under new ownership”

…And from the very informative site,  Poole Twintone.co.uk by Anne Wilkinson – a whole website devoted to this sub set of Poole pottery.

  • “Poole Pottery (Carter, Stabler and Adams) produced two-coloured tableware from the 1930s, but had to stop production during World War Two. When they re-launched the range in the late 1940s, they named it Twintone. Twintone was used on three shapes of tableware, many table accessories and a whole host of decorative ware right up to 1981”
  • “Not all Poole tableware of the mid-20th century is Twintone, even if it appears to come in two colours. Twintone glazes are described as ‘semi-matt’ or ‘vellum’ because of their smooth feel and soft sheen, and they always come in two distinctive colours.
  • Other glazes used on Poole tableware are sometimes known as Cameo. Cameo glazes have a much higher gloss and are always paired with white. Many Twintone pieces can be identified by the ‘C number’ on their base, which defines the colour combination”

Read more about the story of the twintone range on Anne’s Website above where you can also purchase a book she has written on Poole Twintone.

The images below are pieces I have had, and are  a combination of: Read more