Skip to content
Advertisements

Diana Australia, Fish Ramekin Set

Have a look at this fabulous and fun set of fish ramekins or bowls from Australian pottery “Diana” c1950s, possibly early 1960s.

They are made from slipcast earthenware, as most production pottery would have been at this time. Typical of the colours of this time – which all work so well together. I like the attention to detail like the grey shading on the exteriors, the hand painted eyes, and the fins which have managed to survive intact for about 60+ years.

The stamp you see on the base of one of them below is of course depicting Diana the Huntress (Roman Mythology), the logo of this pottery during that era.

If you are not familiar with Diana Pottery, see my previous post Diana Australia (which has further links for more of the history of this pottery)

Diana Australia - Fish Shaped Ramekins c1950s

Diana Australia – Fish Shaped Ramekins c1950s

More after the page break:  Read more

Advertisements

Midwinter Sienna, Mexicana – Jessie Tait

Every piece I come across from this series is so beautifully elegant and well proportioned – a fantastic example of 1960s modernism and industrial design at its best.

The pattern for “Sienna” was designed by British design icon Jessie Tait for the Fine Range (1962-1978). It was one of the top selling designs from this series.

The forms for the Fine Range were designed and developed by the Marquis of Queensberry in collaboration with Roy Midwinter.  As well as considering the forms, an improved white clay body was developed, along with a new tougher glaze. The shapes were loosely based on a milk churn – and the straight sides were the perfect vehicle for a wide range of patterns – over 60 designs were created for this series.

Every aspect of this design has been carefully considered, from the shapes to elements such as the lid which shaped in quite a complex manner underneath so it will not fall out when being poured. This considered, quality design you rarely come across these days.

Along with Sienna, another of my personal favourites from the Fine series is “Mexicana”, again by Jessie Tait – this was the only hand painted pattern in the series – but this also proved so popular the pattern was later applied as a transfer.

Midwinter Sienna - Jessie Tait

Midwinter Sienna – Jessie Tait

Midwinter Sienna - Jessie Tait

Midwinter Sienna – Jessie Tait

Midwinter Sienna - Jessie Tait

Midwinter Sienna – Jessie Tait

Read more

Anne Dangar Exhibition

Anne Dangar, Ceramics from Moly-Sabata.

Art Gallery of New South Wales. 11 Aug – 28 Oct 2018.

Better acclaimed in her country of adoption, France, Anne Dangar (b.1885 Australia-d.1951 France ) is known for her innovative pottery designs that combine traditional techniques and modernist designs.

The Art Gallery of NSW is holding a display of major acquisitions by this important Artist from August 11th – 28 October 2018.

From the Art Gallery NSW Website:

“An early exponent of cubism in Australia, (Dangar) was closely involved with local modernists Dorrit Black, Rah Fizelle and Grace Crowley. She moved permanently to France in 1930, becoming the central figure in an artists commune, “Moly-Sabata’, by French cubist painter Albert Gleizes.

The Gallery has acquired a significant group of Dangar’s ceramics which were in the private collection of Gleizes and Juliette Roche, with the support of the Fondation Albert Gleizes and the Mollie Douglas bequest fund. Many of these works recently featured in an Anne Dangar survey exhibition in France – at the Musée de Valence – where she is highly regarded. These new acquisitions will be exhibited for the first time in Australia, alongside other Dangar works from the Gallery’s holdings”

You can read more about Anne’s life on the Australian Dictionary of Biography HERE , A few excerpts from which are below:

While assisting at the Sydney Art School in 1929, she met opposition when she attempted to introduce ideas about cubism and modern art, and was further frustrated by the parochial attitude of her family. Early in 1930 she travelled to the south of France where she joined an artists’ commune, Moly-Sabata, which had been set up at Sablons, (near Ardêche, France) by the cubist Albert Gleizes and his wife Juliette, née Roches.

Dangar became the central figure at Moly-Sabata……. Respected as a teacher of drawing and design, Dangar successfully exhibited her pottery in France; in 1939 she spent six months in Morocco, based at Fez, as ‘monitress’ to local potters, and was in turn influenced by their traditional Islamic designs..Back in  France in 1947 her own kiln was built  and she worked there until her death in 1951. 

 

To see more of Dangar’s ceramics online – there is a collection of lovely images of Dangar’s ceramics on the blog of collector and writer David Herbert  HERE  where the lovely teapot below is from:

Anne Dangar Teapot

Anne Dangar Teapot, Collection of David Herbert via his blog “itstartedwithajug.blogspot”

Read more

Ilja Chapoff (2)

I was so pleased to hear from readers Alan & Val who were able to provide some more snippets of information about, and some images of pieces they have by Ilja Chapoff.

Ilja was a WWII refugee to Australia, and worked as a potter painter and sculptor in until the 1980s mainly in New South Wales (see my previous post here)

Alan and Val met Ilja when they ran a small art gallery where they sold some of his work. The gallery was next to their printing business in Narwee 1974/1975.

During this period Ilja was living in the Narwee/Riverwood area. They recall him being a quiet and gentle man, who before he migrated to Australia had taught and practised as an artist in Europe (possibly Prague) for many years, but had to flee with nothing when he came to Australia.

They purchased some of his work at that time, and kindly sent me some photographs of it:  Read more

Glit Iceland

In the previous incarnation of this website, I had a brief article on Glit Pottery, Iceland. At the time I could not find out much about the maker, except that early Glit works were heavily textured and utilised volcanic lava melted into the glaze as decoration. This early Glit pottery featuring pumice, lava rock and ash was not that well known at that time outside Iceland, but over the past few years has become very collectable.

The images below are of a large piece of Glit pottery I had in 2013.

Glit Iceland

Glit Iceland

Glit Iceland

Glit Iceland

Glit Iceland Stamp

Early Glit Iceland Stamp

Recently I found out more about Glit, when I came across the Design Museum Iceland, which in 2013 held a retrospective exhibition of works from Glit Pottery.

Read more

Royal Doulton “Kay”, c1914

This lovely Art Deco design is from Royal Doulton c1914 from their “D” series of dinnerware.

Called “Kay” the design features a charming hand painted design in an Art Deco style, in blue overglaze on plain creamware//earthenware.

Pieces in this design don’t seem to have survived well if used, as the eathenware or “creamware” base is quite “soft”, and easily prone to chipping, crazing, cracking etc. However considering the year this was released, at the start of World War 1, industry would have been facing some very tough times.

You can work out the production dates from these “D” series wares from Doulton 1899 to 1964 on the link here

Royal Doulton Kay 1914

Royal Doulton Kay 1914

Royal Doulton Kay 1914

Royal Doulton Kay 1914

Read more

Søholm Denmark, EJ64 Krukke//Crock.

This large piece is from the EJ64 series by Einar Johansen for Søholm Denmark in the 1960s. I found it recently at an auction.

The unusual form which I haven’t come across before was designed to be used as a food storage crock or cookie jar by the look of it.

Subsequently it is quite a large, heavy piece.

 

Soholm EJ64 Series Crock

Soholm EJ64 Series Crock

Read more

Arabia Ali Teapot

This is a piece I haven’t come across before.

The design of course is “Ali”, from Arabia Finland. The decor by Raija Uosikkinen and form by Kaj Franck. This is a large teapot, at least 4-6 cup capacity.

I love the gently tapering form and the overall balance of the design – made doubly impressive by the blue “Ali” variation by Raija c1960s for Arabia.

See my previous post on the work of Raija Uosikkinen HERE

 

Arabia Finland, Ali Blue Teapot

Arabia Finland, Ali Blue Teapot