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Arabia Ali Teapot

This is a piece I haven’t come across before.

The design of course is “Ali”, from Arabia Finland. The decor by Raija Uosikkinen and form by Kaj Franck. This is a large teapot, at least 4-6 cup capacity.

I love the gently tapering form and the overall balance of the design – made doubly impressive by the blue “Ali” variation by Raija c1960s for Arabia.

See my previous post on the work of Raija Uosikkinen HERE

 

Arabia Finland, Ali Blue Teapot

Arabia Finland, Ali Blue Teapot

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Conny Walther

The pot in the first image is a quite large and heavily textured piece of studio pottery by the very well known Danish Ceramicist, Conny Walther (b1931 – d?).

Conny started off at Saxbo Pottery 1948-1949, but left after a year and studied the Arts and Crafts School in Copenhagen 1949-1951 where she graduated as a ceramicist.

She then worked at Kahler Ceramics in Naestved 1951-1952, before opening her own studio in Birkerod, north of Copenhagen with her husband, Artist Bent Stubbe Teglbjerg – who sometimes decorated her works. In her later years she worked as a painter.

Her early work consisted of high fired earthenware, simply decorated with thick glossy glazes, before moving on to high fired stoneware with ash glazes (askeglasurer).

In the 1960s and 70s she experimented freely with stoneware sculptures composed of burned, unglazed, part geometric, part organic shapes of porcelain clay, often which with heavily textured surfaces.

I think the first piece here belongs to a period in the middle somewhere, early 1960s probably. It is high fired stoneware, with what appears to be a clear ash glaze. Her CW cypher is one that is instantly recognisable.

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Rorstrand Fiesta

Rorstrand “Fiesta” was produced c1950s by Rorstrand Sweden. It is a timeless design, equally at home in a contemporary kitchen. This was a golden era for Rorstrand, with designers like Marianne Westman, Birger Kaipiainen, and Inger Person working there. The designs by Marianne Westman are said to have produced 45% of the company’s turnover in the 1950’s to mid 1960’s

However I haven’t been able to ever find any reference to the designer of “Fiesta” which came in 3 colour-ways. Yellow, Red and Blue.

The design is a simple, striking design consisting of a black line pattern, over hand-painted yellow, blue or red banding. The forms are simple, generous, streamlined and elegant.

Rostrand Fiesta

Rostrand Fiesta – Yellow Variation

Rostrand Fiesta - Yellow Variation

Rostrand Fiesta – Yellow Variation

Rostrand Fiesta - Yellow Variation

Rostrand Fiesta – Yellow Variation

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Arabia Finland , Anja Jaatinen-Winquist

Anja Jaatinen-Winquist (b 1934 – ) started with Arabia Finland in the late 1960s while the company was going through a rapid period of change and expansion, and she continued working at Arabia in the product design department until 1974.

She designed several tableware services for Arabia including the M model “Karelia” with its iron oxide decoration, “Saara” (in production 1971-1976), and also Kalevala, and Paju (which came in both blue and yellow variations)

Anja was also a very skilled wheel thrower and made one-off items for the art department…although these works are very hard to find now.

Arabia Finland Saara

Arabia Finland Saara

Arabia Finland Saara

Arabia Finland Saara

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Eva Zeisel “Ceylon”

It is not well known that Eva Zeisel (1906- 2011) – more known now as an iconic America designer, in her youth was an important emerging designer in West Germany.

The very striking design in this post by Eva is called “Ceylon” and was design by her at Schramberger, and later developed further at Carstens. It appears to be now very rare.

Eva Zeisel was born Eva Stricker into a Jewish family in Budapest, where she studied painting at the Royal Academy of Art from 1923 -24 and sold some of her pottery designs at open air markets.

Around 1925 she was employed by Schramberger Majolikafabrik as in the Black Forest, as their chief designer. Here she produced over 200 designs, many of which weren’t well documented. Many of them though stayed in production long after she left Schramberger. Some of them have been reissued by MoMA in New York, the Brooklyn Museum and others.

In 1930, she moved to Berlin, where she worked  briefly for Carstens Lübeck, then for about 18 months at Carstens-Hirschau and also as an independent designer.

Eva designed several coffee and tea sets including this Ceylon for Carstens-Hirschau.

The tea service “Ceylon” was released in 1933, and produced until about 1935 with at least 4 documented patterns. The design for “Ceylon” was obviously designed earlier by Eva though, as there are a number of pieces you can find with the Schramberger Ceylon stamp like the one in this post.

I love the sugar bowl in the first image below – it looks like something of a cross between Bauhaus, Cubism and Futurism.

The influential Bauhaus and the emerging Modernist movement must have been quite an influence on Eva at the time. You will notice some subtle differences between the larger plate design (above) and the smaller plate design (below).  I would love to see what the cups and tea/coffee pots from this service looked like – but havent been able to locate any images.

Carstens-Hirschau closed production in 1956, while the Schramberg facilities closed in the late 1980s.

Some of information above has been sourced from the informative Spritzdekor website here: 

Eva Zeisel "Ceylon", Schramberger

Eva Zeisel “Ceylon”, Schramberger

Eva Zeisel "Ceylon", Schramberger

Eva Zeisel “Ceylon”, Schramberger

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Auction Watch 2018.2 – Dorothy Hafner’s “Flash”

The amazing dinner setting in this post just popped up in my email and took my breath away. It is part of a large “Design from the 20th Century” auction at Lauritz.com starting on May 6th.

It is of course the now iconic Rosenthal design “Flash”.

“Flash” was designed by Dorothy Hafner for Rosenthal in 1982 (released 1984) and quickly became an 80’s iconic design…and seems to be currently attracting a whole new audience.

Dorothy Hafner is an American painter and sculptor who started her career in ceramics in 1973 after training as a painter and sculptor.  She designed a number of dinnerware designs for Rosenthal including “Tango”, “New Wave”, “Suomi Day and Night”  as well as the stunning “Chevron” design for Tiffany.

The influences cited on Dorothy’s website are:

“The poetry of the sea, the marvel of outer space and scientific imagery, and the love of music and dance are the inspirational springboards from which from Hafner has worked for over 30 years”

Like all dinnerware services, the visual power and presence of a service when seen together like this is so much more impressive, and gives us an insight into the design process and creativity of its creator.

The estimated price for this dinner set is EUR 1300. It will be interesting to watch what it sells for.

Rosenthal "Flash" Dorothy Hafner

Rosenthal “Flash” Dorothy Hafner. Photo Lauritz.com

Rosenthal "Flash" Dorothy Hafner

Rosenthal “Flash” Dorothy Hafner. Photo Lauritz.com

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Denby Troubador

Another of my Denby favourites is “Troubador” (sic). Designed in the early 1970s.

It is beautifully simple and delicate pattern of superbly hand painted magnolias with leaves in soft greens and pale browns with the faintest touch of dusty pink, on a simple stone coloured stoneware.

I really like the forms of the 1960s – early 1970’s Denby – especially forms such as the bowls and plates in  this series.

Timeless but contemporary at the same time – and gaining popularity to a new generation currently.

The pattern, form design and quality production of this dinnerware is sadly almost non existent these days – apart from hand made studio pottery – which this most closely resembles.

Denby Troubador

Denby Troubador

Denby Troubador Read more

Denby Cottage Blue

Denby Cottage Blue was introduced in 1926 and continued to be popular into the 1980’s – a very long running design by any standards.

Cottage Blue is typified by its blue mottled glaze which is partly transparent (I would call it Imperial Blue – it isn’t a bright cobalt blue). Contrasting with the blue is the lovely buttercup yellow interior on most of the forms.

It was introduced on the traditional shapes Denby was using at the time – and it looks like more shapes were added as time went by.

I’ve seen it attributed to Donald Gilbert – but I don’t think that can be correct as he didn’t join the firm until 1931.

Here are some of the charming pieces from Cottage Blue. I particularly like the angled forms of some of the ramekins and serving dishes.

Denby Cottage Blue Teapot

Denby Cottage Blue Teapot

Denby Cottage Blue Group

Denby Cottage Blue Group

Denby Cottage Blue Ramekins

Denby Cottage Blue Ramekins

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