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Posts from the ‘Stavangerflint’ Category

Stavangerflint Sera – Inger Waage

This pattern caught my attention straight away, I thought it had to be a design by Inger Waage for Stavangerflint Norway, and my thoughts were correct. While Inger Waage is very well known for her iconic hand painted art-ware pottery, she also designed over 25 dinner ware designs, this being one of the better known designs. 

The design is called “Sera” and was designed by Inger in 1968. It was in production for several years into the 1970s when more colourful designs became the fashion.

The forms that the “Sera” design sits on I find equally interesting,  and they were used for several different designs at Stavangerflint during this era. The form designs were designed by Kåre Berven Fjeldsaa. The handles of the pots and jugs of this series of forms are quite different from anything else at the time, and they are so good in the hand – perfectly ergonomic and balanced. A lot of considered thought has gone into the form designs, which sadly we don’t see much after the 1970s in production ware. 

If you want to learn more about Inger Waage and Stavangerflint there is an excellent facebook page HERE

Stavangerflint Sera

Stavangerflint Sera – Inger Waage 1968

Stavangerflint Sera

Stavangerflint Sera

Stavangerflint Sera

Stavangerflint Sera – Image via “Phrantique” on Etsy

 

Inger Waage – Stavangerflint – “Darling” Design

The ceramic designs and patterns of Inger Waage (1923-1995) are some of the most recognised of Norway along with those of Turi Gramstad Oliver. They stand out as now iconic mid-century modern and are highly sought after by collectors and lovers of good design around the world.

Inger Waage attended the Norwegian Crafts and Art Industry School in Oslo, studying ceramics between. 1943 – 1946. Following this she worked in her own pottery in Stavanger 1943-1946, and then worked at Stavangerflint from 1953 to 1979 with an extraordinary output of designs.

Rather than me re-writing what has already been researched and published about her work – the best place to find out more about her work is on the beautiful and very comprehensive website created by Ole Gustavsen and Jan Gjerde in Norway here where you can see her works divided into its 5 main groups: Hand-painted pieces, Tableware designs, Souvenir designs, One off pieces, and Works from her own pottery.

I don’t come across Inger’s Waage’s work often, but when I do it stands out like a beacon. Recently I found a bowl pictured here from the “Darling” series design by Inger in 1962. The series features either a male motif, female motif or both male/female together, or fruit motif on different pieces. The pattern is a combination of hand-painted and silkscreened design. You can see others of the designs in this series in Ole’s web page for “darling” HERE

Inger Waage Stavangerflint "Darling"

Inger Waage Stavangerflint “Darling” Photo Ray Garrod

Inger Waage Stavangerflint "Darling"

Inger Waage Stavangerflint “Darling” Photo Ray Garrod

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Stavangerflint Norway “Tiril”, Anne Lofthus

Stavangerflint Norway “Tiril”, Anne Lofthus

This charming design has a 1950s look about it I think, but is actually a 1960 design by Anne Lofthus (1932-2003) for Stavangerflint Norway, called Tiril.

You can find out a whole lot more about Anne Lofthus, including most of the patterns which she designed at Stavangerflint, on the  hugely informative Stavangerflint research site HERE 

She was employed at Stavangerflint 1959-1963, and from 1967 worked from her own studio where she was active until the mid 1990s.

The yellow border on “Tiril”  is hand painted, and each piece has a slightly different intensity – partly from fading, and partly from the weight of the brush used when painting. The border on “Tiril” is similar to the style of many of the designs of Rorstrand from around the same time. Anne’s style is often easily recognisable through it’s references to Norwegian folk art and culture.

Stavangerflint Tiril

Stavangerflint Tiril

Stavangerflint Tiril

Stavangerflint Tiril Platter

Below: A variation of this design also came with a bluish green rim ( from the Stavangerflint site linked above ) Read more