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Posts from the ‘Denby’ Category

Denby Studio 1960s

This impressive looking series called “Studio” was released by Denby c1961 as a dinnerware set with a number accessories or decor items.

It seems pretty uncommon these days, except for some reason the accessories like jugs, small vases etc. which seem to pop up reasonably often.

The forms for this series were designed by Kenneth Clark who also designed the Gourmet range – and this shape was also used for Ode and Echo (a blue version of Ode).

 Kenneth Clark (1922 -2012)

“Took a domestic product that had become boring in its ubiquity and transformed it with technical knowledge and design flair into a vehicle of delight and usefulness. His designs honoured the traditions of studio pottery while incorporating the technical innovations of commercial potteries”

The glaze on studio is a beautiful speckled soft glossy grey with soft edged dark brown vertical lines. Inside the glaze is a glossy cream colour. The glaze would probably have been designed by either Albert or Glynn Colledge.

Denby Studio Tall Jug//Vase

Denby Studio Tall Jug//Vase

Denby Studio Cups – image via MotherMust Etsy

Denby Studio Jug

Denby Studio Jug – via ebay

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Denby Romany

The Denby design “Romany”  is from the 1970’s – but I don’t have an exact date.

Apparently this striking glaze came about from an accidental mixing of the wrong proportions in a glaze recipe – and when it was fired and shown to Glynn Colledge he loved the effects of the glaze with its runs and thicker brown areas on top of the “old gold” glaze…so it went into production as a range.

It has that very 1970’s handmade feel about it, and is yet still contemporary – especially with some of the forms such as the bowl in the first image. Some of the pieces of Romany display lovely colour runs in the glaze, and the colour can vary from piece to piece quite a bit as you can see below – but this all adds to the charm of the design I think.

The Romany glaze has a lovely satiny smooth feel to the touch as well. Denby pottery is also all very tough stoneware – so if cared for it will easily last for decades.

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Denby Troubador

Another of my Denby favourites is “Troubador” (sic). Designed in the early 1970s.

It is beautifully simple and delicate pattern of superbly hand painted magnolias with leaves in soft greens and pale browns with the faintest touch of dusty pink, on a simple stone coloured stoneware.

I really like the forms of the 1960s – early 1970’s Denby – especially forms such as the bowls and plates in  this series.

Timeless but contemporary at the same time – and gaining popularity to a new generation currently.

The pattern, form design and quality production of this dinnerware is sadly almost non existent these days – apart from hand made studio pottery – which this most closely resembles.

Denby Troubador

Denby Troubador

Denby Troubador Read more

Denby Cottage Blue

Denby Cottage Blue was introduced in 1926 and continued to be popular into the 1980’s – a very long running design by any standards.

Cottage Blue is typified by its blue mottled glaze which is partly transparent (I would call it Imperial Blue – it isn’t a bright cobalt blue). Contrasting with the blue is the lovely buttercup yellow interior on most of the forms.

It was introduced on the traditional shapes Denby was using at the time – and it looks like more shapes were added as time went by.

I’ve seen it attributed to Donald Gilbert – but I don’t think that can be correct as he didn’t join the firm until 1931.

Here are some of the charming pieces from Cottage Blue. I particularly like the angled forms of some of the ramekins and serving dishes.

Denby Cottage Blue Teapot

Denby Cottage Blue Teapot

Denby Cottage Blue Group

Denby Cottage Blue Group

Denby Cottage Blue Ramekins

Denby Cottage Blue Ramekins

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Denby Pottery Teak Salt + Peppers

Denby Pottery Teak Salt + Peppers

Something I have only discovered a year or so ago thanks to Maija from Copenhagen.  Maija found some fantastic looking Denby Salt & Pepper shakers with teak bodies. I have seen Denby items before  combined with teak trays or stands but haven’t seen this before – where the teak is used as part of the form or design.

The first use of teak used to compliment Denby Pottery I have seen to date is from Gill Pemberton’s “Arabesque” series, – which matches the time period teak started to become very popular (the early 1960s through to the mid 1970s)

A quick Google search for Denby+Teak resulted in dozens of images of Denby S&P’s with teak bases, mostly from the Potter’s Wheel series – with some fantastic colour variations.

The first 2 images below are from Maija – and it is a bit hard to know if these are from a particular  Denby series, or if they were produced as stand alone pieces to go with a variety of designs. I think they are closest in colour and glaze to Arabesque – but their shapes bear no relationship to the strong angular shapes of the Arabesque pieces.

I have often read these designs were a collaborative Dansk – Jens Quistgaard design which is incorrect, but finally I have been able to identify their designer.

The Danish link was correct, but the wrong assumption of Quistgaard has been made by many people. Gill Pemberton tells me these were designed by freelance Danish designer Kurt Franzen c1974, who also created for Denby the very smart “Gourmet” (second version, not the Kenneth Clark version) dinnerware series. It appears to have been renamed the “Gourmet Vanilla” pattern soon after release.

Denby Potters Wheel Salt & Peppers. Photo Maija, Denmark.

Denby Potters Wheel Salt & Peppers. Photo Maija, Denmark.

Denby Potters Wheel Salt & Peppers

Denby Potters Wheel Salt & Peppers. Photo Maija, Denmark.

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Denby Ode

Denby Ode

Denby Ode (glaze and pattern) was created by Glynn Colledge,  issued by Denby in 1961 and in production until about the late 1970’s.

I love the colour of the satin-matt mustard glaze – referred to by Denby as Antique Gold. The colour also matches the stoneware body really well, and contrasts with the bright white interior of many of the forms. The plates from “Ode” are stunning pieces of design with their beautiful Greek key sgraffito design in white.

Gill Pemberton tells me that the forms for this series were actually designed by Kenneth Clark who also designed the Gourmet range – a shape that was later used for Studio, as well as Ode and Echo (a blue version of Ode).

We don’t hear much of Kenneth Clark (1922 -2012) these days, but click on the link on his name above to read about his importance to British Design in the 20th century.

He took a domestic product that had become boring in its ubiquity and transformed it with technical knowledge and design flair into a vehicle of delight and usefulness. His designs honoured the traditions of studio pottery while incorporating the technical innovations of commercial potteries

 

Denby Ode Teapots

Denby Ode Teapots

Denby Ode Teapot (inside view)

Denby Ode Teapot (inside view)

Denby Ode Sauce Salt/Pepper

Denby Ode Sauce Salt/Pepper

Denby Ode Sauce Boat/Saucer

Denby Ode Sauce Boat/Saucer

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Denby Potter’s Wheel

Denby Potters Wheel

Denby “POTTERS WHEEL”  was designed by David Yorath, 1973.

The forms for this dinnerware were actually designed by Gill Pemberton in her Bokhara series, and given a new life with David’s pattern & colours.

Potter’s Wheel was produced between 1974 and 1987. It has a simple otameal and iron oxide brown glaze and  simple pattern of concentric circles.

There are varations in the intensity of the colours much like other Denby stoneware.

The centre area of the plates was glazed in either a rust, yellow, green or blue colour (but finding a plate other than in rust colour is very rare these days)

Denby Potter's Wheel

Denby Potter’s Wheel

Denby Potter's Wheel Plate

Denby Potter’s Wheel Plate

Denby Potter's Wheel

Denby Potter’s Wheel Bowl

Denby Potter's Wheel Plates

Denby Potter’s Wheel Plates

Denby Potter's Wheel

Denby Potter’s Wheel

Denby Potter's Wheel Colours

Denby Potter’s Wheel Colours

There was also a range of giftware designed to match this set which I really like. Each piece is different because they were hand-painted.  The range seems to consist of vases, jardinieres, and small bowls. I really like the texture and finish of these pieces and their design is timeless.  David also made a number of one off pieces in similar colour-ways to these. Read more

Denby Glynbourne

Denby Glynbourne

Glynbourne Ware (not to be confused with Glyndebourne ware which is a different design) was designed by Glyn Colledge in 1960. It was marketed as a prestige product and sold until about the 1970’s when the exotic designs of Gill Pemberton and David Yorath were more favoured.

Glynbourne continues the long Denby tradition of traditional high quality stoneware, hand thrown and hand decorated.

Production Studio Pottery at its best. Each piece was handpainted in natural tones of browns and greens with a simplified decorative pattern of leaves….the glaze is just wonderful to the touch.

It has continued to be a very collectable range to the present day.

Denby Glynbourne

Denby Glynbourne Planter

Denby Glynbourne

Denby Glynbourne

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