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Posts from the ‘Danish Studio Potters’ Category

Max Thorsbro Pedersen – Dybbøl Pottery Denmark

I found the interesting little piece of pottery in the first 3 images some time ago, and only just recently stumbled on its maker. Originally I read it as “Dybdahl” but of course it is not even in their style. It is a piece by Max Thorsbro Pedersen from Denmark c1950s from his Dybbøl Pottery in South Jutland Denmark. 

I found a little about Max from the Danish website for Broager.dk – a community website for Broager.dk, designed for the use of the citizens of the city and region around Broager. The website has some history of the Ceramics and Art of the area, including how Max Throsbro Pedersen fits in to the story. 

After the closure of the Broager Railway in 1932, the station building in Broager has been used for various purposes, most recently as a station inn. In 1937, manufacturer C H Clausen opened a pottery workshop, Broager Keramik, in the station building with Ingemann Nielsen as potter. In 1945, the pottery passed to Max Thorsbro Pedersen, who employed three journeymen, three apprentices and three ladies, who mainly decorated the pottery.

Broager Keramik produced small and large vases, Aladdin lamps, milk jugs, maternity pots, dishes and dolls’ frames and ashtrays.There is still a lot of ceramics from Broager Keramik, especially in Broagerland, where Broager Church’s twin spiers are stamped on the back of the goods.

In 1959, Broager Keramik closed and Max Thorsbro Pedersen opened a small pottery workshop in Dybbøl

It is unclear how long the pottery run by Max Pedersen in Dybbol operated until….if anyone knows contact me and I can fill in the gaps. I would also be interested to see more of his work – there doesn’t seem to be much of it around online. 

Max Thorsbro Pedersen- Dybbøl Pottery

Max Thorsbro Pedersen- Dybbøl Pottery – Photo Ray Garrod

Max Thorsbro Pedersen- Dybbøl Pottery

Max Thorsbro Pedersen- Dybbøl Pottery – Photo Ray Garrod

Max Thorsbro Pedersen- Dybbøl Pottery

Max Thorsbro Pedersen- Dybbøl Pottery – Photo Ray Garrod

I also found these interesting pieces on Etsy: 

Max Thorsbro Pedersen- Dybbøl Pottery

Max Thorsbro Pedersen- Dybbøl Pottery – Photo via Etsy store “LikeADanish”

Max Thorsbro Pedersen- Dybbøl Pottery

Max Thorsbro Pedersen- Dybbøl Pottery – Photo via Etsy store “LikeADanish”

Max Thorsbro Pedersen- Dybbøl Pottery

Max Thorsbro Pedersen- Dybbøl Pottery – Photo via Etsy store “LikeADanish”

…AND this fantastic large piece I noticed on 1stDibs. 

Max Thorsbro Pedersen- Dybbøl Pottery

Max Thorsbro Pedersen- Dybbøl Pottery- Photo via 1st Dibs

Stogo Demark Stoneware Dinnerware

I’ve written previously about the Danish Potter Herluf Gottschalk Olsen HERE . As well as his own studio pieces he produced high quality, hand made production ware at Stogo Pottery Denmark (which was formerly Mørkøv Ceramics founded in 1940 by Peter Hansen).

Stogo Pottery closed in the mid 1980s, but Olsen died much earlier in 1968 at aged just 52. This dinnerware setting by Olsen appears to be from the early 1960s – and is the one you will find most often from Stogo Pottery today – the lack of wear on pieces is a testament to its toughness and durability.

The dinnerware consist of high stoneware fired pieces, with a typically fritted dark Danish stoneware clay. The colour of the clay bleeds through beautifully into the light highly glossy pinkish oatmeal colour glaze on them. I love the detail on the pieces like the ridges on the handles of the cups, and the grips on the creamer – in addition to the beautifully made, sophisticated, and well designed forms.

Stogo Denmark

Stogo Denmark

Stogo Denmark

Stogo Denmark

Stogo Denmark

Stogo Denmark

Stogo Denmark

Stogo Denmark

Stogo Denmark

Stogo Denmark- Cereal Bowls

Stogo Denmark

Stogo Denmark- Photo via Happy Moose Vintage Etsy

Stogo Denmark

Stogo Denmark- Photo Via Happy Moose Vintage Etsy

Stogo Denmark

Stogo Denmark- Creamer

 

Stogo Denmark

Stogo Denmark bowls 

Aksini Denmark

Aksini pottery Denmark is something I come across from time to time. The name comes from shortening of the name of designer Aksel Sigvald Nielsen. (b1910-d1989) who started up his own pottery in 1954 with his son, after working at Knabstrup Pottery from 1929 to 1954. 

The pottery produced a wide range of mainly domestic wares, but it is the biomorphic, black and white sculptural forms that are probably the stand out designs from this pottery.

I also like the pieces from Aksini with  coloured cross hatching designs as seen below. The pottery was mainly fajance decorated earthenware, but you can find stoneware pieces from time to time. I haven’t been able to find out when the pottery closed, but probably late 1980s. 

You can see a photo of Aksel in his pottery on the Danish Arkiv website here

 

Aksini Denmark

Aksini Denmark Biomorphic Vase – Photo Ray Garrod

Aksini Denmark

Aksini Denmark Photo via “zowivintage” etsy

Aksini Denmark

Aksini Denmark m Photo via “danishdims” etsy

Aksini Denmark

Aksini Denmark m Photo via “danishdims” etsy

Aksini Pottery also produced decorative domestic ware, and recently I discovered the interesting items below. They are salt and pepper shakers, one has “Pebermø” on the back and the other “Pebersvend”. Apparently these terms are old Danish language for “Spinster or Old Maid” and the male equivalent . 

Aksini Denmark Salt & Pepper

Aksini Denmark Salt & Pepper – Photo Ray Garrod

Aksini Denmark Salt & Pepper

Aksini Denmark Salt & Pepper – Photo Ray Garrod

Aksini Denmark Salt & Pepper

Aksini Denmark Salt & Pepper – Photo Ray Garrod

Aksini Denmark Salt & Pepper

Aksini Denmark Salt & Pepper

Holbaek Museum in Denmark holds some of Nielsen’s original sketches from his time at Knapstrup, but they are no longer available online sadly, and neither is the wonderful resource that was Knabtrup-specialst in Denmark that had a thorough history of Knabstrup Pottery, its designers and a catalogue of items produced at Knabstrup. 

On that topic, so much important historical information which was available on the net just 3- 5 years ago has not been retained or maintained and a lot of history is sadly being lost. Even many of the major makers of pottery with proud, important and long histories have removed historical references from their website, and now produce websites that focus purely on advertising, glamour, and sales, and the “dumbing down” of the importance of their history into a few lines if at all…it’s sad to see how much is being lost, especially since a lot of it is not recorded in books or other hard documents.

 

Aksini ware is often hand signed as below, but stamped logos were also used later on.