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Posts from the ‘United Kingdom’ Category

Midwinter Nurseryware – Jessie Tait

This charming and now very nostalgic looking design is Midwinter “Nurseryware” c1955. Its designer, the incomparable Jessie Tait.

The design is now incredibly rare, and pieces from the series pop up very rarely, but I was fortunate to find a few pieces from the series recently in an auction lot of pottery oddments.

While the shapes here probably do not represent the complete range of this transfer printed design on the “Fashion Shape”  – you can get a good feel for the theme of the design. It is not known what other pieces there are with variations of this pattern, but Steven Jenkins in his authoritative book on Midwinter Pottery also mentions tankards with hand painted  pink elephants holding each others tails as part of the range.

The design is so much of its time – with motifs designed to appeal to boys such as trains, Indian headdress, cricket bat, aeroplanes, spinning tops etc. One would assume that a pattern was also produced with motifs appealing to girls, as much as this one would appeal to boys at the time.

If you have, or know of any other pieces in this series, I would love to see them.

Midwinter Nurseryware 1950s Jessie Tait - Photo Ray Garrod

Midwinter Nurseryware 1950s Jessie Tait – Photo Ray Garrod

Midwinter Nurseryware 1950s Jessie Tait

Midwinter Nurseryware 1950s Jessie Tait – Side Plate – Photo Ray Garrod

Midwinter Nurseryware 1950s Jessie Tait

Midwinter Nurseryware 1950s Jessie Tait – Saucer – Photo Ray Garrod

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Alfred Meakin Seaside Series

The very mid-century looking “seaside” themed design featured in this post is “Clovelly” by Alfred Meakin Potteries, U.K. c1950.

Seaside themes were very popular in the 1950s and early 1960’s – some that immediately come to mind are the Midwinter Pottery designs “Cannes” and “Riviera” by Hugh Casson.

It isn’t as well known however that Alfred Meakin Potteries produced a number of series with seaside themes. They were all very popular and have now become very collectable, as much because of their smart designs as increasing rarity. The designer of the series doesn’t seem to be documented anywhere but I would love to know.

Amongst the seaside themes produced by Meakin were Fisherman’s Cove, Polperro, Regatta, Brixham, Clovelly, St. Ives, and Nice. Stylistically they are very similar with use of similar motifs in similar colours. Some of the wares are back-stamped with a colourful stamp and the name of the design, other times just the Alfred Meakin stamp….making it difficult to tell which seaside pattern you have. There is also a pattern called “Sea Breezes” – but this a little stylistically different from the above patterns, although from the same time.

I was only able to identify the design below as “Clovelly” by finding the identical pattern with images of the clovelly backstamp on it, for sale (sold) online here . You will often find discrepancies with identification of this series because they are so difficult to tell apart.

Some of the individual motifs are repeated in the seaside themed patterns…….also, to add to the confusion, designs in a setting appear to have been sometimes combined e.g. further down is an image of what appears to be the Brixham and Clovelly designs combined in one dinner set. This could have occurred at the original point of sale, or further down the track as a replacement piece.

Unless pieces have the backstamp with a pattern name it can be sometimes very difficult to tell the “Seaside” patterns apart.

As well as the white bone china, the designs were also put on a very pale Venetian blue body.

Alfred Meakin Clovelly

Alfred Meakin Clovelly – Photo Ray Garrod

Alfred Meakin Clovelly

Alfred Meakin Clovelly – Photo Ray Garrod 

 

Alfred Meakin Clovelly

Alfred Meakin Clovelly – Photo Ray Garrod 

 

Alfred Meakin Clovelly

Alfred Meakin Clovelly – Photo Ray Garrod

 

Alfred Meakin Clovelly

Alfred Meakin Clovelly – Photo Ray Garrod 

 

Alfred Meakin Brixham

Alfred Meakin Brixham – Photo via ebay.

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Poole Bokhara – Robert Jefferson 1964

Robert Jefferson graduated from the Royal College of Art in 1954, and worked as a lecturer in ceramics at Stoke-on-Trent College of Art before being appointed designer at Poole Pottery in 1958, where he worked until 1966.

While he is well known for his reinvigoration of Poole Pottery with the Poole Studio and iconic Delphis  series, plus the introduction of the latest glazes and technologies to the factory,  there is so much more to this very talented designer.

A now lesser known, and increasingly rare series designed and introduced by Jefferson at Poole in 1964, was the “Bokhara” series.

Below are a few examples from the Bokhara series I was fortunate enough to come across recently.

The series was entirely hand thrown and hand decorated – which is a rarity for 1960s production/table ware. There are nine different shapes of jars and vases in the series, and some come in two or more sizes, with most having more than one surface pattern – making a total of 29 pieces in total listed on the factory pattern sheet….although the odd variation in pattern/colour has been known to appear as well.

In addition to the colour-ways listed on the factory production sheet Bokhara forms can also be found in Poole Twintone colours, and some traditional Poole patterns and colours.

You can read and see a bit more about this series and others by Jefferson on Rob’s Poole Pottery authoritative website HERE 

Poole Bokhara, Shape 658

Poole Bokhara, Shape 658 OHA (Old Gold/Sepia)

Poole Bokhara Preserve Jar Shape 655 OBA sepia/orange/black

Poole Bokhara Preserve Jar Shape 655 OBA sepia/orange/black

Poole Bokhara 675

Poole Bokhara 675. A tapering form in black and sapphire on a blue ground. 1 of 2 sizes in the colourway called JB. This form seems to be the most valued and collectable at the time I write this.

 

Poole Bokhara 656

Poole Bokhara 656 OE.B (Sepia/Chinese Blue)

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