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Posts from the ‘United Kingdom’ Category

Ridgway Romany

I’ve never come across a dinnerware set quite like this one before – consisting of 2 very different styles and production techniques.

The maker is RIDGWAY (Staffordshire).  The cups and bowls are hand thrown from a terracotta clay and glazed in a dark olive green matt glaze – A great shape too – they are wide at the bottom and narrower at the top.

They’re really quite chunky – and you would think they were handmade by a studio potter – except for the stamp on the bottom.

In almost complete contrast is the bone china plate-ware designed for this setting. It is bone china, with hand-painted greens and blues  – but when its all together – the design simply works, with the green hues of the plate ware tying it all together. I think it is a fascinating experiment in tying together traditional plate ware design, with the developing “hand made” movement of the late 1960s.

The pattern is “ROMANY”. (not to be confused with Denby Romany and many other makers who used this name during the 1960’s)

The backstamp is from the 1960’s. Ridgway were quite a large group of Staffordshire Potteries produced  many brands including – Colclough, Paladin, Portland, Adderley and Gainsborough potteries.

Of course Ridgway were also the producers of the now iconic “Homemaker” by Enid Seeney

Ridgway Romany

Ridgway Romany

Ridgway Romany

Ridgway Romany

Ridgway Romany

Ridgway Romany

Ridgway Romany

Ridgway Romany

Ridgway Romany back stamp

Ridgway Romany back stamp

 

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Denby Studio 1960s

This impressive looking series called “Studio” was released by Denby c1961 as a dinnerware set with a number accessories or decor items.

It seems pretty uncommon these days, except for some reason the accessories like jugs, small vases etc. which seem to pop up reasonably often.

The forms for this series were designed by Kenneth Clark who also designed the Gourmet range – and this shape was also used for Ode and Echo (a blue version of Ode).

 Kenneth Clark (1922 -2012)

“Took a domestic product that had become boring in its ubiquity and transformed it with technical knowledge and design flair into a vehicle of delight and usefulness. His designs honoured the traditions of studio pottery while incorporating the technical innovations of commercial potteries”

The glaze on studio is a beautiful speckled soft glossy grey with soft edged dark brown vertical lines. Inside the glaze is a glossy cream colour. The glaze would probably have been designed by either Albert or Glynn Colledge.

Denby Studio Tall Jug//Vase

Denby Studio Tall Jug//Vase

Denby Studio Cups – image via MotherMust Etsy

Denby Studio Jug

Denby Studio Jug – via ebay

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Midwinter Berkeley

Midwinter Berkeley is a design by Jessie Tait for Midwinter, produced 1969-1974. It is quite a rare design these days. The pattern was produced on the “Fine Shape” Series which Midwinter started in 1962.

The design consists of a band of squares in alternating olive and turquoise, with an alternating centre colour.

The design to me reflects the influence of colour theorist Joseph Albers....who’s work significantly influenced 20th Century Art & Design – including “Op Art”  popular in art, design and culture at the time – and especially big in Britain and Germany.

Midwinter Berkeley

Midwinter Berkeley

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Denby Romany

The Denby design “Romany”  is from the 1970’s – but I don’t have an exact date.

Apparently this striking glaze came about from an accidental mixing of the wrong proportions in a glaze recipe – and when it was fired and shown to Glynn Colledge he loved the effects of the glaze with its runs and thicker brown areas on top of the “old gold” glaze…so it went into production as a range.

It has that very 1970’s handmade feel about it, and is yet still contemporary – especially with some of the forms such as the bowl in the first image. Some of the pieces of Romany display lovely colour runs in the glaze, and the colour can vary from piece to piece quite a bit as you can see below – but this all adds to the charm of the design I think.

The Romany glaze has a lovely satiny smooth feel to the touch as well. Denby pottery is also all very tough stoneware – so if cared for it will easily last for decades.

Denby Romany Read more

Wedgwood Pennine

Wedgwood Pennine was a hugely popular oven-to-tableware dinner service in the 1960s and 1970s.

It has that very English “country rustic” look and feel about it – but unlike much other British dinnerware of the era was very tough and durable, and can still be found quite easily in excellent condition.

Pennine was produced from 1965-1971.

Wedgwood Pennine

Wedgwood Pennine Cup & Saucer

Wedgwood Pennine

Wedgwood Pennine Oatmeal or Soup Bowl

On the excellent Wedgwood Museum website I found the following history of the design…. Read more

Midwinter Queensberry

Midwinter “Queensberry” was the first a series of very popular striped patterns introduced by Midwinter (and many other manufacturers) in the early 1960s. It was in production 1962-1978 on the “Fine” Shape.

As suggested by the name, the pattern was designed by the Marquis (David) Queensberry – who also designed the forms of this series along with Roy Midwinter.

The design of Queensberry had smaller rims than other designs in this series, but was otherwise the same. Features of the Fine Shape series included stackable items and dual function pieces on straight sided forms.

The design consists of stripes of varying widths in olive, yellow ochre, grey and black.

The design reminds me of lines drawn with oil pastels or crayon – and works so well on these “Fine Series” forms. Although a transfer printed design, it has the appearance of being hand painted.

Midwinter Queensberry

Midwinter Queensberry

Midwinter Queensberry

Midwinter Queensberry

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Midwinter Sienna, Mexicana – Jessie Tait

Every piece I come across from this series is so beautifully elegant and well proportioned – a fantastic example of 1960s modernism and industrial design at its best.

The pattern for “Sienna” was designed by British design icon Jessie Tait for the Fine Range (1962-1978). It was one of the top selling designs from this series.

The forms for the Fine Range were designed and developed by the Marquis of Queensberry in collaboration with Roy Midwinter.  As well as considering the forms, an improved white clay body was developed, along with a new tougher glaze. The shapes were loosely based on a milk churn – and the straight sides were the perfect vehicle for a wide range of patterns – over 60 designs were created for this series.

Every aspect of this design has been carefully considered, from the shapes to elements such as the lid which shaped in quite a complex manner underneath so it will not fall out when being poured. This considered, quality design you rarely come across these days.

Along with Sienna, another of my personal favourites from the Fine series is “Mexicana”, again by Jessie Tait – this was the only hand painted pattern in the series – but this also proved so popular the pattern was later applied as a transfer.

Midwinter Sienna - Jessie Tait

Midwinter Sienna – Jessie Tait

Midwinter Sienna - Jessie Tait

Midwinter Sienna – Jessie Tait

Midwinter Sienna - Jessie Tait

Midwinter Sienna – Jessie Tait

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Royal Doulton “Kay”, c1914

This lovely Art Deco design is from Royal Doulton c1914 from their “D” series of dinnerware.

Called “Kay” the design features a charming hand painted design in an Art Deco style, in blue overglaze on plain creamware//earthenware.

Pieces in this design don’t seem to have survived well if used, as the eathenware or “creamware” base is quite “soft”, and easily prone to chipping, crazing, cracking etc. However considering the year this was released, at the start of World War 1, industry would have been facing some very tough times.

You can work out the production dates from these “D” series wares from Doulton 1899 to 1964 on the link here

Royal Doulton Kay 1914

Royal Doulton Kay 1914

Royal Doulton Kay 1914

Royal Doulton Kay 1914

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