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Posts from the ‘United Kingdom’ Category

Royal Doulton “Iris”

Royal Doulton “Iris” V1346

Sometimes there are designs which you come across which are simply blindingly beautiful, and this happened   when I saw this design as a set for the first time.

I don’t collect or buy a lot of Royal Doulton, but I do really like some of their series from the first half of the 20th Century, in particular from the Art Deco Era.

This is the era in which Doulton created some outstanding designs which were popular for decades to follow.

The pattern is  “Iris” V1346, which was manufactured between 1937 and 1940 – officially not in the Art Deco Era – but such an archetypal art deco design with its design of an Iris. The angles and forms are also an identifier of the Art Deco era.

The shapes I think are actually very similar to Royal Copenhagen of the same period – like Fensmark and Quaking Grass.

The hand painting on this set is exquisite, as is the use of colour and line. Each piece is like a work of art and it’s fascinating to see how it all fits together – e.g. when the cup is on the plate how the shapes and design relate to each other so well.

 

Royal Doulton Iris Royal Doulton Iris Royal Doulton Iris Read more

Royal Doulton “Rosslyn”

Royal Doulton “Rosslyn” D5399

After 80+ years Royal Doulton Rosslyn is still a very popular design in Australia.  It is probably because it was so popular in its period – (designed in 1933 but produced for years) as a wedding gift – that many people grew up with either their mother or grandmother having at least a few pieces of the set, if not the whole thing. In this era dinner sets were huge, and usually consisted of over 100 pieces.

What I like about the Rosslyn pattern is its Art Deco look with the stylised floral motif combined which is combined with black line work on a cream coloured glaze. The floral design isn’t over fussy, and has an almost Japanese quality about it.

The black line work also reminds me of the Architecture of that period too and of the Californian Bungalow style (1920-1939) with its black timber work staining in each room (“Japaning” as it was called).

There was also a version of this which instead of the black outline, had an orange outline – but to me that version does not work. The orange line looks lost on the design, which loses its impact because of it.

Below are some images of pieces in this design which have passed through my hands. Royal Doulton Rosslyn Royal Doulton Rosslyn Royal Doulton Rosslyn Read more

Midwinter Designs by Charles Cobelle

Midwinter Designs by Charles Cobelle

When I first found the Midwinter Pottery items in the first image below at an auction, I was reminded of the work of French artist Leger…….I was on the right track at least (French)

The design turns out to be by painter Charles Cobelle (born Carl Edelman (1902-1994).  His early career was in France then continued in the U.S. from the 1920’s.

I found a record of the design in the Midwinter Pottery book by Steven Jenkins. The design is called Desert Scene, and is a transfer print from a painting by Cobelle – It is known as a pattern on a range of dinner ware in the “Fashion Shape” (c 1955-1960)

Midwinter Dinnerware- Charles Cobelle Desert Scene

Midwinter Dinnerware, Charles Cobelle Desert Scene

Here is a fascinating summary of the life and work of Cobelle from Wikipedia: Read more

Denby Potter’s Wheel

Denby Potters Wheel

Denby “POTTERS WHEEL”  was designed by David Yorath, 1973.

The forms for this dinnerware were actually designed by Gill Pemberton in her Bokhara series, and given a new life with David’s pattern & colours.

Potter’s Wheel was produced between 1974 and 1987. It has a simple otameal and iron oxide brown glaze and  simple pattern of concentric circles.

There are varations in the intensity of the colours much like other Denby stoneware.

The centre area of the plates was glazed in either a rust, yellow, green or blue colour (but finding a plate other than in rust colour is very rare these days)

Denby Potter's Wheel

Denby Potter’s Wheel

Denby Potter's Wheel Plate

Denby Potter’s Wheel Plate

Denby Potter's Wheel

Denby Potter’s Wheel Bowl

Denby Potter's Wheel Plates

Denby Potter’s Wheel Plates

Denby Potter's Wheel

Denby Potter’s Wheel

Denby Potter's Wheel Colours

Denby Potter’s Wheel Colours

There was also a range of giftware designed to match this set which I really like. Each piece is different because they were hand-painted.  The range seems to consist of vases, jardinieres, and small bowls. I really like the texture and finish of these pieces and their design is timeless.  David also made a number of one off pieces in similar colour-ways to these. Read more

Beswick Zorba

Beswick Zorba 1960s

The pattern “Zorba” was designed by Graham Tongue in the late 1960’s at Beswick.

It also comes in a pale Olive Green colour, but this “mission brown” colour brings out the pattern much better I think. I like the shapes of the pieces in this range too – especially the cups.

Beswick also made some other great retro designs during this period including “Apollo” and “Orbit” – All very space age retro.

Royal Doulton took over the Beswick factory in 1969 and  in 1975 Graham Tongue became the head modeller at the Beswick and added many new characters to their range of Figurines in the 1980’s.

The Beswick factory closed in 2003 and much of the Royal Doulton production was moved overseas, because it was no longer commercially viable.

Beswick Zorba

Beswick Zorba

Beswick Zorba Coffee Pot

Beswick Zorba Coffee Pot

Beswick Zorba

Beswick Zorba

Read more

Royal Doulton “Basque”

Royal Doulton Basque

This oh so seventies looking design was produced at the Lambeth factory of Doulton between 1974 and 1981.

Going by the number of pieces from the set for sale on various online shops still, it must have been a very popular pattern.

Its easy to see the design is classic seventies even without knowing much about it.

It has the loveliest dark chocolate brown coloured glaze- a colour often called “mission brown” in its day when it was often used as a paint trim colour in houses.

The design consists of a subtle design of country flowers in a basket.  The glaze has a great sheen and smoothness to it as well.
I like the shape of the pieces too, solid but with rounded edges and with nice proportions – quintessentially British.

Being stoneware it is very tough as well. I have seen photographs of several other patterns by Doulton using this form as well, but Basque stands out from the others.

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque

Royal Doulton Basque Mark

Royal Doulton Basque Mark

Poole Cameo Celadon

Poole Cameo Celadon, 1950s and 1960s.

Firstly a brief background about Poole from a site which is no longer up (Poole Pottery.org)

  • “Poole Pottery was established in 1873 by Jesse Carter. In the 1920’s, Jesse Carter went into partnership with Harold Stabler and John Adams, forming a company known as “Carter Stabler Adams” and this company in turn, eventually became known as Poole Pottery. Production continued at the Poole Quayside factory until 1999, when it moved to Sopers Lane. The factory closed in 2006, but it has recently restarted production under new ownership”

…And from the very informative site,  Poole Twintone.co.uk by Anne Wilkinson – a whole website devoted to this sub set of Poole pottery.

  • “Poole Pottery (Carter, Stabler and Adams) produced two-coloured tableware from the 1930s, but had to stop production during World War Two. When they re-launched the range in the late 1940s, they named it Twintone. Twintone was used on three shapes of tableware, many table accessories and a whole host of decorative ware right up to 1981”
  • “Not all Poole tableware of the mid-20th century is Twintone, even if it appears to come in two colours. Twintone glazes are described as ‘semi-matt’ or ‘vellum’ because of their smooth feel and soft sheen, and they always come in two distinctive colours.
  • Other glazes used on Poole tableware are sometimes known as Cameo. Cameo glazes have a much higher gloss and are always paired with white. Many Twintone pieces can be identified by the ‘C number’ on their base, which defines the colour combination”

Read more about the story of the twintone range on Anne’s Website above where you can also purchase a book she has written on Poole Twintone.

The images below are pieces I have had, and are  a combination of: Read more

Kiln Craft Bacchus

Kiln Craft Staffordshire – Bacchus Design

“Kiln Craft” Bacchus was huge in the 1970’s as utilitarian and affordable kitchen ware –  It is probably not highly collectable, as it isn’t as tough and long-lasting as many wares from other English potteries of the period – but I like it because of the pattern design which couldn’t be more seventies, and also the forms in the series.

Additionally the trademark “Kiln Craft” logo would have to be one of the most iconic pieces of Graphic Design from the 1970’s

Kiln Craft Bacchus - Tea Cup

Kiln Craft Bacchus – Tea Cup

Kiln Craft Bacchus Stamp

Kiln Craft Bacchus Stamp

Kiln Craft was produced by Staffordshire Potteries Ltd., which grew out of the Keele Street Pottery Group. In the 1950s they were producers of utilitarian white cups, and dinner wares.

During the 1960s and 1970s the company concentrated on the production of mugs as well.

Kiln Craft Bacchus Ramekin Bowl

Kiln Craft Bacchus Ramekin Bowl

Kiln Craft Bacchus Bowl

Kiln Craft Bacchus Bowl

The Kilncraft brand name was introduced in 1972 and introduced a new range of modern shapes, colours and surface decorations, such as the Bramble and Bacchus ranges.

This range was so successful that the name and trade mark was adopted as the corporate symbol for Staffordshire Potteries Ltd.

Read more