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Posts from the ‘United Kingdom’ Category

Cinque Ports Pottery

I came across the striking vase in the first images recently, and was immediately attracted to it. From the distance I thought it might have been a piece of Lapid Israel pottery, but on closer inspection it turned out to be British – by Cinque Ports Pottery Ltd, The Monastery. It is a pottery I knew next to nothing about so did a quick bit of research and in the process found some quite lovely pieces of British Mid Century pottery. (Cinque Ports is a historic series of coastal towns in Kent, Sussex and Essex U.K.)

Cinque Port Pottery was founded by David Sharp in 1956 with George Gray…the name was later changed to Cinque Ports Pottery Ltd and changed later again include the name of the operating premises at “The Monastery” when George Gray took over this incarnation of the pottery in 1964, after an amicable split between the two owners.

In the 1980s the pottery was handed over to a Jim Elliot, first trading as Cinque Ports Pottery, without the ‘Limited’, then later as Cinque Ports Ltd, without the “Pottery”

The pottery operated until July 2007 until its final closure.

From what I can see the pottery was a high quality slip cast, and appears to be stoneware fired or at least high earthenware fired. Some of the output reminds me of Briglin Pottery London, and other pieces remind me of the potteries of Cornwall and Rye. As I mentioned earlier it also reminds me of Lapid Pottery, with its use of hand painting, and high quality stoneware fired, slip cast pottery.

If searching for this pottery online the autocorrect of many search engines will change to totally unrelated things – the worst in case is the Etsy search function.  To get any results on the Etsy search function you need to use the words “Cinque Port Pottery” to get any results.

The names and locations of this pottery can be a bit confusing, but you can read a more comprehensive history on the Studiopottery.com site or in the book “The Potteries of Rye: 1793 Onwards, Carol Cashmore” pub 1999 if you can locate a copy. (out of print)

 

Cinque Ports Pottery, The Monastery, Vase 1970s

Cinque Ports Pottery, The Monastery, Vase 1970s, Photo Ray Garrod

Cinque Ports Pottery, The Monastery, Backstamp

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Midwinter Kismet

The very impressive decorative pattern on this Midwinter trio is “Kismet”, in production from 1968-1974. The design reflects so well the time in which it was designed – the late 1960s. This was a time of interest in all things Indian, spirituality, batik, psychedelia and The Beatles – amongst other things. It is such a joyful pattern.

The pattern was designed by Joti Bhowmik, who also designed a variation of this design in blue, purple, green and mustard called “Bengal” which was in production from 1968-1970. I haven’t been able to find out any more about Joti Bhowmik unfortunately, and cant find any other patterns them other than Kismet and Bengal.

The forms on which the designs appear are of course the very popular “fine shape” which was designed by the Marquis (David) Queensberry and Roy Midwinter in 1962, and introduced to the market a much stronger and durable ceramic with brighter colours, on a simpler and more modern, functional and streamlined profile.

Midwinter Kismet

Midwinter Kismet

 

Midwinter Kismet

Midwinter Kismet

Midwinter Kismet

Midwinter Kismet

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Carlton Ware Wellington

This very space age looking design is from 1971. It is a design called “Wellington”, and is by Carlton Ware, Stoke-on-Trent, England – a maker normally associated with quite traditional wares.

It was released in a very large range of colours and often with floral patterns, as both dinnerware items and decor items.

The frequent use of floral patterns and “earthy” colours with this smart design seems a quite an incongruous pairing, as florals are not normally something you would associate with “space age design”…… these days anyway.

However this sort of combination could often be seen in the early 1970s – A period that saw simultaneously the revival of studio based craft practices, the “flower power” movement, and the emergence of cutting edge futuristic “space age” design. You can often see this often odd combination of styles in the home magazines of the 1970s.

The intense red glaze on the photo below via the NGV Melbourne is my pick of the best colour-way in this interesting series.

Carlton Ware Wellington

Carlton Ware Wellington, Photo via Etsy Shop “Keepsies”

Carlton Ware Wellington

Carlton Ware Wellington – Photo Ray Garrod

Carlton Ware Wellington

Carlton Ware Wellington – Photo Ray Garrod

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