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Posts from the ‘Danish Factory Potteries’ Category

Michael Andersen Denmark – Marianne Starck & The Persia Glaze

While the award winning and amazing “Persia” glaze at Michael Andersen & Sons was developed in the 1930s by Daniel Andersen (1885-1959) and used on pieces from that date, I think it is the designs of Marianne Starck at MAS & Sons in the 1950s and 1960s where the Persia glaze is seen at its best.

This complex glaze turns out differently on each piece, depending on the glaze colourants used and style of decoration. Sometimes it appears like a pearlescent multi coloured micro-mosaic, and at other times as a more subtle pattern decoration with grey pearlescent hues. Often the pieces using this glaze have beautiful but subtle oxidisation of the glaze, giving some of the colours a slightly metallic appearance – especially noticeable on the red colour of the Viking longboat in the first image below. 

The glaze is also surprisingly smooth and silky to the touch. The Persia glaze was used on all types of forms – from utilitarian pieces to sculptural forms.

Below are some of my favourite pieces using the Persia glaze. 

Michael Andersen Denmark, Persia Glaze Bowl, Marianne Starck

Michael Andersen Denmark, Persia Glaze Bowl, Marianne Starck – Photo Ray Garrod

 

Michael Andersen Denmark, Persia Glaze Bowl, Marianne Starck

Detail – Viking Design on Michael Andersen Denmark, Persia Glaze Bowl, Marianne Starck

 

Michael Andersen Denmark, Persia Glaze Lamp

Michael Andersen Denmark, Persia Glaze Lamp, Marianne Starck, Photo Ray Garrod

 

Michael Andersen Denmark, Persia Glaze Dish, Marianne Starck

Michael Andersen Denmark, Persia Glaze Bowl, Marianne Starck, Photo Ray Garrod

Michael Andersen Denmark, Persia Glaze Dish, Marianne Starck

Michael Andersen Denmark, Persia Glaze Dish, Marianne Starck, Photo Ray Garrod

Michael Andersen Denmark, Persia Glaze Bowl,  Marianne Starck

Michael Andersen Denmark, Persia Glaze Bowl, Marianne Starck – On this piece the Persia glaze effect is much more subtle, because of the large areas of colour in the design. Photo Ray Garrod

Michael Andersen Denmark, Persia Glaze Dish, Marianne Starck

Michael Andersen Denmark, Persia Glaze Dish, Marianne Starck, Photo Ray Garrod

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Hjorth Pottery Denmark – Ulla Hjorth

Ulla Hjorth (b. 1945), the daughter of Eric Hjorth (who in turn was great grandson of founder Lauritz Hjorth 1834-1912) started at Hjorth Pottery on Bornholm, Denmark, in 1962 and worked there until its closure in 1992. Along with her sister Marie Hjorth, they were the last operators of the Hjorth Pottery from 1982 until its closure and then development into a museum  in 1992-1995. 

Ulla’s work is beautifully functional and elegant at the same time. I especially love her lidded forms. The decoration she chooses compliments, and is united with the form, and is not merely “surface decoration”. The decoration often consists of a combination of simple geometric forms with beautifully brushed line-work, on top of a simple stoneware glaze. 

Her pottery as far as I am aware is all stoneware, with simple timeless glazes.  

When doing a bit of research for this entry I noticed that the Bornholms Musuem has an updated entry on Hjorth Pottery entitled “The Women at Hjorth’s Factory”. 

In the section on potter Ulla Hjorth it says:

Ulla was educated at the School of Arts and Crafts in Copenhagen in 1969 and is very much into the functional. The factory’s tradition was combined with new impressions from the School of Arts and Crafts. Ulla Hjorth works with stoneware and mainly manufactures utility items in simple, classic shapes and glazes. Her work has been characterized as utility ceramics with qualities beyond the purely practical. “I emphasize that a teapot must be functional and that it is united with the shape” she said.

See previous articles on L Hjroth pottery in the navigation table to the right of the page. 

Ulla Hjorth Denmark

Ulla Hjorth Denmark – Photo Ray Garrod

Ulla Hjorth Denmark

Ulla Hjorth Denmark – Photo Ray Garrod

Ulla Hjorth Denmark

Ulla Hjorth Denmark – UH signature, along with LHjorth. Photo Ray Garrod

Ulla Hjorth

Ulla Hjorth – Photo via BonrholmsMusuem.dk

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Royal Copenhagen Baca, Shape 3266

I never knew this shape existed until I came across it recently. This tiny little Royal Copenhagen lidded box is from the very popular BACA fajance series in the 1960s. Pieces from this series have become real collectors items, and its easy to see why.

The design is number 711, on shape 3266 – a box measuring a tiny 4.5cm square x 3cm high.

Nils Thorsson designed all the forms for this series, and the 711 pattern on this piece is his design as well.

It has proved to be one of most popular patterns of the BACA series with its lovely textured glaze of green, white and blue hues; and each piece turning out slightly different because of the method of glazing Nils Thorsson developed for this series.

 

Royal Copenhagen 711/3266

Royal Copenhagen 711/3266 Royal Copenhagen 711/3266

You can read all about this series and its artists in my previous post HERE 

The other form this 711 pattern is seen on is the series of 3 various sized square bottle forms like the one below…..but I have yet to see it on any other forms with pattern 711 except for the bottle and small box form…..If you know of any others I would love to see them.

Royal Copenhagen Pattern 711, Nils Thorsson

Royal Copenhagen Pattern 711, Nils Thorsson