Skip to content
Advertisements

Posts from the ‘Danish Factory Potteries’ Category

Nils Thorsson Løvspring, Royal Copenhagen 1943

I bought the vase below at auction some time ago, not knowing anything about the design – but it just had that quality of something special.

With help of a reader in the U.K. who had the design in another shape, it was finally identified when she wrote to Royal Copenhagen who identified the design.

“Your vase is actually very rare. So rare that it is not mentioned in the book about “Aluminia” by E. Winge Flensborg, which has a list of the known items of a small series of vases from 1943/44, named “Løvspring”, by Nils Thorsson. Aluminia was the earthenware factory run together with The Royal Copenhagen Porcelain Factory. Due to the situation under the war there was a shortage of raw materials and Thorsson sought to come up with alternative materials. This series is made from red clay. The items came with glazes in various colours: Yellow, brown, green and blue over a scrafitto-decoration.  It was a very short lived production.”

The piece is made from terracotta clay and the surface colour comes from what appears to be a clay slip brushed over the clay and then covered with a clear low fired (borax probably) glaze which is pitted with tiny air bubbles typical of low fired glazes using easily available inexpensive materials. The sgraffito design is really makes the piece. Like many early pieces of Nils Thorsson it is not signed, but stamped for 1944. The shape is number 2338 – (16x 12cm).

Since being identified, I have seen the design on odd occasions, but it remains an elusive design.

Royal Copenhagen, Nils Thorsson - Løvspring

Royal Copenhagen, Nils Thorsson – Løvspring

Read more

Advertisements

Lin Utzon for Rosendahl Denmark

Lin Utzon for Rosendahl Denmark

This post is about a design that is not quite 20th Century, but very close to it. Also it ticks all the right boxes for me – Danish, Blue & White, Great Designer, Superb Porcelain, First class Manufacturer.

Erik Rosendahl established Rosendahl, Copenhagen in 1984. They are one of the top manufacturers in Denmark of design for the home and table. Their list of their designers and licences is remarkable.

In 2005, to  mark the bicentenary of HANS CHRISTIAN ANDERSEN, Rosendahl launched a Hans Christian Andersen dinner service, designed by Lin Utzon to celebrate this anniversary.

The 31cm service plates from the dinner service below, designed by Lin Utzon, are inspired by six of Hans Christian Andersen’s best-known fairy tales: The Little Mermaid, The Ugly Duckling, The Snow Queen, The Butterfly, Thumbelina and The Nightingale. The motifs are white and stand out brilliantly against the deepest of cobalt blues – a combination that hallmarks many of Lin Utzon’s creations. This dinner service won the prestigious Germany design prize DESIGN PLUS 2004.

Lin Utzon, Rosendahl, Hans Christian Andersen Dinner Service

Lin Utzon, Rosendahl, Hans Christian Andersen Dinner Service – The Ugly Duckling/Swan

Read more

Knud Kyhn

Knud  Kyhn  1880-1969

Knud Khyn was a an accomplished Danish painter, draughtsman and ceramic sculptor. My interest in his work lies in his evocative, superbly modelled ceramics.

He worked at Royal Copenhagen over several periods –  c1903-1910, c1924-1932 and c1936-1967.

He also worked at Herman Kähler’s Pottery c1920-1924 and also at Bing & Grondahl 1908-1915 and 1933-1935.

His animal figurines capture so so well the mass and expression of his subjects, in addition to capturing the essence of their characters, how they move, and how they play. Many of these figurines use a glaze popular at Royal Copenhagen during this era – an iron rich “Sung” glaze – (fired in the kiln once only)

The figurines I come across most often are the “3 bears” by Knud, which come in several sizes. Going by the number of them that come up for sale still on the secondary market they seem to have been the most popular.  There is so much more Knud Kyhn work to discover though, and pictured below are some examples.

Pieces like the Royal Copenhagen studio pottery bowl with the blue hand-painted bull motif below, are much rarer and harder to find – as are some of the “production” stoneware pieces like the “Mare and Foal” Royal Copenhagen bowl.

Together with his wife Julie Bloch Kyhn, Knud also operated a studio from their home in Farum from 1934. Pottery from this studio is usually marked FK for Farum Keramik .

This studio in 1993 was apparently opened to the public but from what I can gather, it was later donated by Bodil Kyhn (Knud’s Daughter) to the Farum Municipality which later sold the house, and the works were donated to the Næstved Museum. Kyhn’s work is also widely represented in major galleries around the world.

You can read Knud Kyhn’s full biography on Weilbach’s datatbase here  

Knud Kyhn, Royal Copenhagen, Elephant Figurine

Knud Kyhn, Royal Copenhagen, Elephant Figurine

Knud Kyhn, Royal Copenhagen, Elephant Figurine

Knud Kyhn, Royal Copenhagen, Elephant Figurine

Knud Kyhn, Mare & Foal Bowl, Royal Copenhagen

Knud Kyhn, Mare & Foal Bowl, Royal Copenhagen

Knud Kyhn, Mare & Foal Bowl, Royal Copenhagen

Knud Kyhn, Mare & Foal Bowl, Royal Copenhagen Base Shot

Knud Kyhn, Royal Copenhagen Studio Bowl

Knud Kyhn, Royal Copenhagen Studio Bowl

Knud Kyhn, Royal Copenhagen Studio Bowl

Knud Kyhn, Royal Copenhagen Studio Bowl

Read more

Marianne Starck “Negro” Series, Michael Andersen & Sons

Marianne Starck “Negro” Series, Michael Andersen & Sons (part 1)

Marianne Starck 1938 – 2007 worked at Michael Andersen & Sons, Bornholm as the Artistic Director from 1955 to its closure in 1993. During these decades her output of designs was vast – but isn’t well catalogued. Every year I  continue to find designs by her which I haven’t come across previously.

Marianne originally come from Germany where she undertook an apprenticeship at the Thoms pottery in northern Germany, and later studied graphic design in Germany at Landeskunstschule (University of Fine Arts, Hamburg).  Her most successful designs at Michael Andersen & Sons often have very strong graphic elements as part of the design – reflecting her training in this field.

One of her most striking and now most coveted and popular series of designs was for the 1950s “Negro” series. This series features white motifs carved through to black clay – the form would have been slip cast first and then finished and carved by hand and you can usually see the carve marks in the black clay.

The motifs in this series vary from abstract forms, to stylised plants, animals and human forms to simple repeat patterns. Usually the glaze is a bright white, but there are also pieces which have a white glaze speckled with oatmeal colour.

There are also some variations on this series which I will show in a future post.

Below are some of the designs I have had, which are just a fraction of the forms from this very large and popular series:

Michael Andersen Denmark, Marianne Starck Negro Series

 

Michael Andersen Denmark, Marianne Starck Negro Series

Michael Andersen Denmark, Marianne Starck Negro Series

Michael Andersen Denmark, Marianne Starck Negro Series

Michael Andersen Denmark, Marianne Starck Negro Series

Read more

Joghus Denmark

Joghus Denmark

Joghus was a pottery on the island of Potteries – Bornholm, Denmark. I was very excited to recently find that in the archives of the city of Roenne, Bornholm are several pages and photo archives of Joghus Pottery.

Johgus was in operation from 1944 to 1999. It was founded by Johannes Pedersen who had been working at Hjorth Pottery, who joined forces with Gustav Ottesen to create Joghus. The pottery produced a wide range of items, mainly in slipcast stoneware. 

The tourist market, figurines, business merchandising, domestic wares and Christmas plates were all important parts of their production.

You can read more about the history of this pottery on the archives of the city of Roenne HERE

I was also very interested to find that in these archives are a number of photos from Joghus catalogues of various series of production from 1944-1999. It is not the entire catalogue of course – but gives a good indication of the style and look of Joghus Pottery over time.

One series which stood out to me is the one I have most often seen from Joghus – which I now have a name for. It is called “Ratonga” and features an ancient or tribal looking motif which was used on a variety of forms with a matte grey green glaze.

There are also photographs of several very attractive, modernist series from the 1950s and 1960s which I have never seen before, but am now keen to get hold of having seen the catalogue photos!  – see last 2 images.

Joghus Denmark, Ratonga

Joghus Denmark, Ratonga

Joghus Denmark, Ratonga

Joghus Denmark, Ratonga Ashtray

Joghus Denmark, Ratonga

Joghus Denmark, Ratonga Jar/Canister – would have had a lid originally

Joghus Denmark, Ratonga

Joghus Denmark, Ratonga base shot. Most pieces of Joghus appear to have this stamp and a number.

 

Joghus "Ratonga"

“Ratonga” Johgus, photo Bjarne Ilsted Bech, Roenne City Archives.

Read more

Lillerød Pottery, Denmark

Lillerød Pottery in Denmark had a long history from 1893 to 1995, but its history is not widely documented. Its story is an example of what I often come across when researching pottery – whereby one potter or pottery becomes well known and well documented, and others simply fade into history for no apparent reason other than coincidence.

Lillerød Lervarefabrik was established in 1893 by J.P.Hansen who built up a thriving pottery with a strong export business. In 1954 it was taken over by Einar Petersen who ran it until its final closure c1995. The output consisted mainly of domestic wares such as jugs, bowls, plates etc – hand painted with simple and attractive designs which reflected their time.

In the early history of the pottery there was an association with local artists, and an important but lesser known Potter and Artist Karl Schrøder is believed to have worked with Lillerød Pottery- or at least use it’s facilities around 1901, and you can read an interesting story about Karl Schrøder in the Allerød local history archives HERE

The youtube video below also gives a good idea of the style and range of work from the early 20th Century right up until its closure. The pottery re-openend briefly after its closure in 1995, but finally closed with a final exhibition in 2006 when this video was made.

Pottery with the stamp “Lillerød” was made from 1955, but before that date I haven’t found what mark, if any were made on the base.

The stoneware “Matenity” Jar in the first image is a traditional Danish form which in earlier times was used to take cooked food to Women who had recently given birth. The form has endured, and is still made by some potteries.

Lillerod Pottery Denmark, "Maternity" Jar

Lillerød Pottery Denmark, “Maternity” Jar

Read more

Anne Marie Trolle – Royal Copenhagen

Anne Marie Trolle, Royal Copenhagen

Anne Marie Trolle (b1944- ) was one of the designers under the direction of Nils Thorsson in the group who created the now iconic Baca and Tenera series.

She also produced some very impressive designs for Royal Copenhagen in the 1970s and 1980s.

2 of Anne Marie’s designs which really stand out from the crowd to me are “Floreana” and “Indigo”.

My favourite is the Tea Caddy, from the Floreana series in 1982.

Royal Copenhagen Floreana Tea Caddy

Royal Copenhagen Floreana Tea Caddy

Royal Copenhagen Floreana Tea Caddy

Royal Copenhagen Floreana Tea Caddy

Part of a series of repeated shapes produced in a choice of patterns based on leaves and spotted fruits. Trolle recorded that this was inspired by a study trip to the Galapagos Islands, the decoration – and to some extent the shapes – reflect Danish artists’ traditional and instinctive response to oriental influences.
http://collections.vam.ac.uk/item/O168193/floreana-tea-caddy-and-trolle-anne-marie

But it is hard to go past “Indigo” for its clean Scandinavian forms and striking deep cobalt blue graphics. It was designed in 1975 by Anne Marie and was in production until 1985. Read more

Richard Manz, Denmark

Richard Manz, Denmark

Richard Manz (1933-1999), husband of Danish ceramicist icon Bodil Manz.

In earlier years Richard worked in Sweden, and even at Gustavsberg for a time. He also studied under Peter Voulkos at Berkeley University of California with his wife Bodil in the late 1960s.

In 1967 he started a studio with his wife Bodil in Starreklinte, Odsherred. They produced several joint works including murals and large sculptural pieces in addition to developing their individual styles. During this period Richard also produced work for Knabstrup pottery in Denmark. You can see some of them on this page

In the mid 1970s they both lived in the town of Arita, Japan for a while – learning the skill of working with very fine translucent porcelain.

The first piece below is one I bought at auction some time ago. I think demonstrates Richard’s mastery of the cylindrical form, for which he (and Bodil) have become so well known for.

While it is a stoneware piece, it is beautifully thin and fine and has been fired to the upper limit for stoneware (around 1300c) making it very hard (and giving it a beautiful sound if you “ping” it) .

The piece displays an obvious mastery of form and the beautifully controlled textures and glazes. I am guessing it would be from the early 1970s.

Richard Manz Denmark

Richard Manz Denmark

Richard Manz Denmark

Richard Manz for Knabstrup, Denmark

Richard Manz for Knabstrup, Denmark

Richard Manz for Knabstrup, Denmark

Richard Manz for Knabstrup, Denmark

Read more