Skip to content
Advertisements

Posts tagged ‘Fajance’

Bangholm Keramik Denmark

Bangholm Keramik Denmark

Bangholm Pottery started operation in 1948 in Skodstrup, near Aarhus Denmark, by Knud Nielsen and his father (also a potter).

The types of wares consisted mainly of domestic and utilitarian items for the home. It reached the height of popularity in the 1950s and 1960s, and became known for its’s colourful striped fajance glazed terracotta pottery which has continued in popularity on the secondary market.

The business was eventually taken over by Iben Scott Lundby, a close friend of the family. Iben had started with Bangholm in 1969 as a trainee who qualified as a potter in 1973.  Iben worked with Bangholm from until 1990 when she took over the pottery. In 1998 the pottery was moved to nearby Ebeltoft. Here the focus was more on unique and one-off ceramics.

Bangholm Pottery in later years evolved into a different business, still run by Iben Scott Lundby. The extract below is from Iben’s current website HERE

My name Iben Scott Lundby. I was skilled as potter in 1973 in the family business  ”Bangholm Keramik”. After education I continued in the pottery with throwing and painting until 1991. Here I took over the business after my parents, who have had a long and exciting life as potters.

The next 8 years, I continued this business with serial production and wholesale of Bangholm Keramik for shops primarily in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. Gradually the throwing and decoration work began to drain the physics, and by the millennium, I decided to move the company to Ebeltoft, where the focus should be more unique work, smaller production, and only with retail sale from my own store.

After a short time in Ebeltoft, I  succeeded in taking over a smaller property on Adelgade 4 in Ebeltoft, near the city’s small and famous old town hall. Here we got a good business location for our store supplied with a workshop building, which allowed organization of a slightly more intimate ceramic atelier for the throwing and painting work.

Now this business has evolved into a lifestyle store with retail sales of jewelry, womenswear, accessories, shoes, and handicrafts. More recently we have completed the physical store with this webshop as a natural additional sales channel.Today we enjoy a fantastic feedback from our customers, which gives us faith in a good development of our business.

Most of the pottery you will find by Bangholm is earthenware-terracotta, with a white tin glaze base – and coloured overglaze. Otherwise referred to as Fajance or Faience. Occasionally I have seen unglazed or partly glazed pieces, but not often.

The images below (except for the impressed backstamp) are all taken by me –  you may find them much copied and mis-attibuted around the web – but most are from my original post on Bangholm Pottery on Blogger in 2011, and 2 later posts.

Bangholm Denmark Bowl and Plate with Striped Glaze

Bangholm Denmark Bowl and Plate with Striped Glaze

Bangholm Denmark Bowl and Plate with Striped Glaze

Bangholm Denmark Bowl and Plate with Striped Glaze

Bangholm Denmark Terrine

Bangholm Denmark Terrine

Bangholm Denmark, Striped Ewer Form

Bangholm Denmark, Striped Ewer Form

Read more

Advertisements

Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen

Nils Johan Thorvald Thorsson (1898 – 1975)

Ceramic artist and designer for Royal Copenhagen – Aluminia.

Nils joined Royal Copenhagen as an apprentice in 1912, and graduated from the royal Danish Academy in 1917. He went on to become Royal Copenhagen’s most prolific designer. He was Artistic director at Royal Copenhagen from 1949 while also artistic director of Aluminia also from 1928-1969.

(Aluminia pottery works was established in Copenhagen in 1863. In 1882, the owners of Aluminia purchased Royal Copenhagen factory. The factories were operated independently under their respective trade names until 1969, when the use of the Aluminia name was ended)

Nils designed at least 5 of  best known production ranges for Aluminia/Royal Copenhagen – Solberg (1930’s), Marselis (1950’s) Tenera (1960’s), Baca (1960’s), Diana (1970’s)

Nils Thorsson, Marselis Series Vase - Aluminia/Royal Copenhagen

Nils Thorsson, Marselis Series Vase – Aluminia/Royal Copenhagen

Nils Thorsson, Solberg Series Vase

Nils Thorsson, Solberg Series Vase, Royal Copenhagen//Aluminia

Nils Thorsson Diana Series Vase, Royal Copenhagen

Nils Thorsson Diana Series Vase, Royal Copenhagen

He also produced many exquisite art pieces in high fired glazes that are lesser known and hard to find. For the Baca and Tenera series he designed the forms (shapes) – and other members of his team designed the patterns. The patterns which he designed will have his cypher on the base.

Nils Thorsson Cypher (bottom)

Nils Thorsson Cypher (bottom in circle)

Baca Pattern 708, Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen

Baca Pattern 708, Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen

Baca Pattern 723, Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen

Baca Pattern 723, Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen

Baca Pattern 721, Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen

Baca Pattern 721, Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen

Baca Pattern 734, Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen

Baca Pattern 734, Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen

Baca Pattern 720, Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen

Baca Pattern 720, Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen

Thorsson, Baca Pattern 719, Royal Copenhagen

Thorsson, Baca Pattern 719, Royal Copenhagen

Baca Pattern 719, On Square Bowl, Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen

Baca Pattern 719, On Square Bowl, Nils Thorsson, Royal Copenhagen

Nils also designed the Morgenfrue and Oranja (Tureby) dinnerware series amongst others.

Oranja/Tureby Tureen, Design Nils Thorsson, Aluminia//Royal Copenhagen

Oranja Tureen, Design Nils Thorsson, Aluminia//Royal Copenhagen

Morgenfrue Cup/Saucer Aluminia, Nils Thorsson

Morgenfrue Cup/Saucer Aluminia, Nils Thorsson

Nils body of work is so large that it is hard to capture a picture of it as a whole, as of course it changed during his lifetime spent at Royal Copenhagen. However his form and pattern designs from the 1950s – 1970’s, especially from the BACA and TENERA ranges, were and remain some of Royal Copenhagen’s most popular works coveted as being prime examples of mid-century and Danish modernism. Read more