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Poole Cameo Celadon

Poole Cameo Celadon Milk Jug

Poole Cameo Celadon, 1950s and 1960s.

Firstly a brief background about Poole from a site which is no longer up (Poole Pottery.org)

  • “Poole Pottery was established in 1873 by Jesse Carter. In the 1920’s, Jesse Carter went into partnership with Harold Stabler and John Adams, forming a company known as “Carter Stabler Adams” and this company in turn, eventually became known as Poole Pottery. Production continued at the Poole Quayside factory until 1999, when it moved to Sopers Lane. The factory closed in 2006, but it has recently restarted production under new ownership”

…And from the very informative site,  Poole Twintone.co.uk by Anne Wilkinson – a whole website devoted to this sub set of Poole pottery.

  • “Poole Pottery (Carter, Stabler and Adams) produced two-coloured tableware from the 1930s, but had to stop production during World War Two. When they re-launched the range in the late 1940s, they named it Twintone. Twintone was used on three shapes of tableware, many table accessories and a whole host of decorative ware right up to 1981”
  • “Not all Poole tableware of the mid-20th century is Twintone, even if it appears to come in two colours. Twintone glazes are described as ‘semi-matt’ or ‘vellum’ because of their smooth feel and soft sheen, and they always come in two distinctive colours.
  • Other glazes used on Poole tableware are sometimes known as Cameo. Cameo glazes have a much higher gloss and are always paired with white. Many Twintone pieces can be identified by the ‘C number’ on their base, which defines the colour combination”

Read more about the story of the twintone range on Anne’s Website above where you can also purchase a book she has written on Poole Twintone.

The images below are pieces I have had, and are  a combination of:

1. The Streamline shape designed in the 1930s by John Adams, with the shiny “Cameo” glaze being introduced in the late 1950s – in 2 colours at first  “Celadon” and “Blue Moon” (a lovely slate blue).  The plates, bowls etc in this first release have rims, lids have white wedge shapes knobs and handles which are gently curved.  I have noticed that the Celadon glaze is often described on eBay, etsy etc. as “Sage green” which is the wrong term to be using.

Poole Cameo Celadon Teapot

Poole Cameo Celadon Teapot

Poole Cameo Celadon Rimmed Bowls

Poole Cameo Celadon Rimmed Bowls

Poole Cameo Celadon Earlier Casserole Shape

Poole Cameo Celadon Earlier Casserole Shape

Poole Cameo Celadon Creme Soup Cup

Poole Cameo Celadon Creme Soup Cup

Poole Cameo Celadon Hot Water Jug

Poole Cameo Celadon Hot Water Jug

Poole Cameo Celadon Sauce Boat

Poole Cameo Celadon Sauce Boat

2. A remodelling of the Steamline shape by Alfred Read (early 1960s? – I havent found the date) giving the distinctive Coupe shape plates, flat shaped knobs and angled shape handles.  I think I like the rimmed plates much more though. More “plateness” about them.

Poole Cameo Celadon - Coupe Plates

Poole Cameo Celadon – Coupe Plates

Poole Cameo Celadon Rimmed Plates

Poole Cameo Celadon Rimmed Plates

Poole Cameo Celadon Serving Tureen

Poole Cameo Celadon Serving Tureen

Poole Cameo Celadon Cups

Poole Cameo Celadon Cups – showing older and newer style of handles

Poole Cameo Celadon - Serving Ramekins

Poole Cameo Celadon – Serving Ramekins

Poole Cameo Celadon Wide Cup

Poole Cameo Celadon Wide Cup – later

Poole Cameo Celadon later jug

Poole Cameo Celadon later jug

I have noticed also that the white glaze in the earlier release has a cream tone to it, while the later release is a bright white. The celadon green is consistent – but looks different in each light.

Below the 3 differing backstamps for Cameo on the above pieces.

Poole Cameo Backstamp

Poole Cameo Backstamp

Poole Cameo Backstamp

Poole Cameo Backstamp

Poole Cameo Backstamp

Poole Cameo Backstamp

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