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Inger Waage – Stavangerflint – “Darling” Design

The ceramic designs and patterns of Inger Waage (1923-1995) are some of the most recognised of Norway along with those of Turi Gramstad Oliver. They stand out as now iconic mid-century modern and are highly sought after by collectors and lovers of good design around the world.

Inger Waage attended the Norwegian Crafts and Art Industry School in Oslo, studying ceramics between. 1943 – 1946. Following this she worked in her own pottery in Stavanger 1943-1946, and then worked at Stavangerflint from 1953 to 1979 with an extraordinary output of designs.

Rather than me re-writing what has already been researched and published about her work – the best place to find out more about her work is on the beautiful and very comprehensive website created by Ole Gustavsen and Jan Gjerde in Norway here where you can see her works divided into its 5 main groups: Hand-painted pieces, Tableware designs, Souvenir designs, One off pieces, and Works from her own pottery.

I don’t come across Inger’s Waage’s work often, but when I do it stands out like a beacon. Recently I found a bowl pictured here from the “Darling” series design by Inger in 1962. The series features either a male motif, female motif or both male/female together, or fruit motif on different pieces. The pattern is a combination of hand-painted and silkscreened design. You can see others of the designs in this series in Ole’s web page for “darling” HERE

Inger Waage Stavangerflint "Darling"

Inger Waage Stavangerflint “Darling” Photo Ray Garrod

Inger Waage Stavangerflint "Darling"

Inger Waage Stavangerflint “Darling” Photo Ray Garrod

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Poole Bokhara – Robert Jefferson 1964

Robert Jefferson graduated from the Royal College of Art in 1954, and worked as a lecturer in ceramics at Stoke-on-Trent College of Art before being appointed designer at Poole Pottery in 1958, where he worked until 1966.

While he is well known for his reinvigoration of Poole Pottery with the Poole Studio and iconic Delphis  series, plus the introduction of the latest glazes and technologies to the factory,  there is so much more to this very talented designer.

A now lesser known, and increasingly rare series designed and introduced by Jefferson at Poole in 1964, was the “Bokhara” series.

Below are a few examples from the Bokhara series I was fortunate enough to come across recently.

The series was entirely hand thrown and hand decorated – which is a rarity for 1960s production/table ware. There are nine different shapes of jars and vases in the series, and some come in two or more sizes, with most having more than one surface pattern – making a total of 29 pieces in total listed on the factory pattern sheet….although the odd variation in pattern/colour has been known to appear as well.

In addition to the colour-ways listed on the factory production sheet Bokhara forms can also be found in Poole Twintone colours, and some traditional Poole patterns and colours.

You can read and see a bit more about this series and others by Jefferson on Rob’s Poole Pottery authoritative website HERE 

Poole Bokhara, Shape 658

Poole Bokhara, Shape 658 OHA (Old Gold/Sepia)

Poole Bokhara Preserve Jar Shape 655 OBA sepia/orange/black

Poole Bokhara Preserve Jar Shape 655 OBA sepia/orange/black

Poole Bokhara 675

Poole Bokhara 675. A tapering form in black and sapphire on a blue ground. 1 of 2 sizes in the colourway called JB. This form seems to be the most valued and collectable at the time I write this.

 

Poole Bokhara 656

Poole Bokhara 656 OE.B (Sepia/Chinese Blue)

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Royal Copenhagen, Johanne Gerber Designs

The first design here is just so impressive and powerful…and It shouts Mid Century Modern. I have only come across it on this large form (no. 3101) which is 36cm tall. Of course it is from Royal Copenhagen and is a design by Johanne Gerber as part of the BACA series at Royal Copenhagen in the 1960s.

Johanne was one of a group of designers and artists under the direction of Nils Thorsson. This group included Berte Jessen, Marianne Johnson, Ellen Malmer, Kari Christensen, Beth Breyen and Grete Helland-Hansen, Johanne(s) Gerber, Anne Marie Trolle and Ivan Weiss.

Most of the forms were design by Nils Thorsson, but Ellen Malmer also designed about 14 of the forms.

A glazing technique was developed by Nils so that each piece turned out slightly differently, giving them a hand-crafted, hand painted appearance due to the nature of the glaze.

The designs of each of the artists/pattern designers is very different. I think the designs of Johanne Gerber are amongst the boldest – often featuring strong contrasting colours as in this example, and often with complex layering of patterns and textures. All of Johanne’s designs have quite a painterly quality – and often remind me of mid 20th century abstract and expressionist painting.

Royal Copenhagen, Johanne Gerber

Royal Copenhagen, Johanne Gerber

Royal Copenhagen, Johanne Gerber

Royal Copenhagen, Johanne Gerber

Royal Copenhagen, Johanne Gerber

Royal Copenhagen, Johanne Gerber

Royal Copenhagen, Johanne Gerber

Royal Copenhagen, Johanne Gerber

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