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Posts tagged ‘Palshus’

Den Permanente, Copenhagen

Den Permanente, Copenhagen

Den Permanente was a very important and relevant Danish Design & Craft store in Copenhagen which operated from the 1930s to the late 1980s. It is particularly relevant to this site as many of the Potters written about here exhibited and sold work at Den Permanente.

The idea for the store was that of Kay Bojesen, a Danish silversmith – but probably today best known for his wooden monkey design. It became a commercial reality when the idea was developed by Christian Grauballe, director of Holmegaard in 1931.

Den Permanente operated as a “Permanent Exhibition of Danish Arts” and promoted the very best in modern Danish design and craft. A large range of objects were sold including furniture, glassware, lighting, ceramics, jewellery and textiles.

Den Permanente, Copenhagen

Den Permanente, Copenhagen, Photographer J.C. Raulston 1972

Items for exhibition and/or sale were chosen after  being assessed by a “Jury” and the managing board. There is a fascinating explanation of the process and more written in 1965 by its director Esbjorn Hoirt which can be read HERE

The store was important not only in Denmark for promoting Danish Design, but world wide. Den Permanente took part in several international exhibitions including the Milan Triennales of 1951-1960;  a 1954-1957 exhibition in the U.S. called “Design in Scandinavia” ; “Formes Scandinaves” in Paris 1958; Neue Form aus Denmark Germany/Austria 1957; and “Arts of Denmark” in the U.S. 1960-61.

It is fascinating to be able to read old catalogues from Den Permanente, and the Royal Danish Library in its fascinating Digital Collections has several Den Permanente catalogues which are well worth looking through. Many of the Danish Ceramicists written about on this site have work in the Catalogues. It is fascinating to see works by people such as Bjorn Wiinblad, Ditlev, Helle Allpass, Palshus and many many more.

There don’t seem to be many photographs of the actual store online, but there are several in the archives of the JC Raulston Arboretum at NC State University, United States, which is where the first 4 images are from.

 

 

Den Permanente, Copenhagen

Den Permanente, Copenhagen, Photographer J.C. Raulston 1972

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Palshus Denmark

Palshus Denmark

Palshus Pottery was founded by husband and wife team Per Linnemann-Schmidt and Annelise Linnemann-Schmidt c1947-1949 near Copenhagen.

Per came from a strong artistic background, having graduated from the Royal Academy of Art in Copenhagen in 1931 and subsequent work as a sculptor.

The studio name is an acronym of P(er),(A)nnelise  (L)innemann, (S)chmidt and HUS (house).

The early pieces from the studio were precise and minimalist in nature, with beautifully silken, matte haresfur glazes – mostly in subtle tones of either brown, blue, green or cream. The simple glazes and forms were a combination of Japanese and Scandinavian influences. Per was self taught in glaze technology and perfected these now iconic Palshus haresfur glazes. Per also often designed and drafted many of the forms and glazes and worked with other craftsmen and Annelise to realise the pieces.

Palshus Haresfur Glaze Bowl

Palshus Haresfur Glaze Bowl

Palshus Haresfur Glaze Bowl

 

At Palshus the 1960s saw a change in style with the use of chamotte (textured clay) along with impressed/sgrafitto patterns, used in conjunction with more roughly textured,  glossy glazes.

Much of the output of Palshus was sold through Den Permanente in Copenhagen – as was the work of many important potters, craftsmen and artists at this time.

Palshus pottery is well marked with “Palshus Denmark” along with an inscribed number or number letter combination (which I believe is the form/shape number), and often a glaze or oxide colour number which is painted (rather than inscribed) on the base as a number or alpha-numerical code.

It will also have either Per’s or Annelise’s (or both) cyphers (PLS, ALS, APLS)….. but over the years several talented artists, sculptors and designers also worked at Palshus – including Kjeld Jorden (figurines), Jens Quistgaard, Billy Eberlein and Hugo de Soto (Artist).

The pottery closed in 1972, three years after the sad death of Annelise in a car accident at the age of 51.Per and Annelise had three children and five grandchildren including the ceramic artist/sculptor Annelise Linnemann Schmidt (named after her grandmother) currently practising in the UK.

 

Palshus Haresfur Glaze Bowl

Palshus Haresfur Glaze Bowl Base

Palshus Chamotte Vessel

Palshus Chamotte Vessel with glossy, textured glaze

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Knud Basse

Knud Basse (1916-1991)

Knud Basse was a Dansish Ceramicist known for his very popular small figures of animals with finely processed matte or “haresfur” glazes.

He was associated with several makers including Michael Andersen & Sons, but his best work came from his workshop in Teglkas-Ronne (on the island of Bornholm Denmark) .

Knud also produced pieces for Danish pottery Palshus.

I have had some of the delightful figurines by Knud in the first few images below: Knud Basse Figurine Knud Basse Figurine

Knud Base Cypher

Knud Base Cypher

Recently I discovered a delightful small form , out of Knud Basse’s own studio on Bornholm, which has a thorn like design and a wonderfully coloured glaze:

Knud Basse Own Studio Vase

Knud Basse Own Studio Vase

The “thorned” design above is similar to a very striking series of larger forms with thorns, which Knud created for Michael Andersen & Sons. These are highly valued, prized pieces to collectors. Read more