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Posts tagged ‘Danish Design’

Tue Poulsen Denmark

Tue Poulsen Denmark

From time to time I come across beautifully formed stoneware forms from Denmark, stamped “TUE” in tiny letters underneath. Tue is the stamp of Tue Poulsen (b1939 -)  a highly accomplished ceramicist and artist who has a permanent gallery and studio in Fårevejle, in the east of Zealand, Denmark.

Tue has a comprehensive website which is so refreshing (and rare it seems!) to find.

The website is jam packed full of wonderful images and information about his work. It is well worth spending some time to read it all.

His sculptural work is astonishing, but equally accomplished are his ceramic vessels – often produced in series. The first image below is of a piece I found recently at an Auction.

Tue Poulson Stoneware Vase

Tue Poulson Stoneware Vase

Tue Poulsen Ceramics

Tue Poulsen Ceramics 1960s-1970s via Tue Poulsen Website

On Tue’s website he also has photographs of early series and works like the one above – which is great to help identify the era pieces were made in.

Tue Poulsen Stoneware Vessel

Tue Poulsen Stoneware Vessel Backstamp

Tue Poulsen Vessel

Tue Poulsen Stoneware Vessel

In addition to his own studio pottery, Poulsen has also designed pieces for Stogo (1963, 1976)), Torben Orskov (1963), lamps for Domus Danica (1970), furniture for Westnova (1973) and ceramics for Knabstrup (1973). Read more

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Lyngby Denmark, Tangent Design

Lyngby Porcelain opened in 1936 in Lyngby, a picturesque town just north of Copenhagen, Denmark. Neils Holst and Christian Knudsen were its original founders, and it was a major supplier of dinnerware to the Danish market from the 1950s until its closure in 1969, after which it was demolished.

At its peak it had over 500 workers -which gives us an idea of the volume of work that they must have produced. Axel Bruel worked there as a designer at its peak as well, and is often (wrongly) attributed as the designer of all patterns. The most iconic series of dinnerware to come out of the Lyngby factory was a series called Danild, consisting of 10 different patterns by different designers.

My favourite is probably Danild 64 – more commonly known as “Tangent”.

Lyngby Tangent Teapot

Lyngby Tangent Teapot

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