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Posts tagged ‘Copenhagen’

Ditlev Denmark, 1967 Catalogue

Ditlev Denmark, 1967 Catalogue

Im very attracted to the smooth streamlined forms which Dane, Henrik Ditlev created on dark chocolate brown clay, along with his superb glaze colours.

Much of what he produced was designed for serving food – dinnerware, teapots, plate-ware, coffee pots, serving dishes and so on. Ditlev pottery was so well made and thrown, with tough glazes and superb quality clay – that when you come across it now, some 50+ years later – it is often still in excellent condition.

Interestingly, the type of plate and serving wares he produced is very much in vogue currently in top end Restaurants around the world. ( See my previous entry for  Ditlev HERE ).

Recently I found in a 1967 Den Permanente Catalogue (which the Royal Danish Library has digitised here) a whole range of Ditlev pieces which were sold through Den Permanente in Copenhagen. These digitised catalogues are such a great resource, especially when trying to identify a date of production and how a whole production series fitted together.

Ditlev Denmark, 1967 Den Permanente Catalogue

Ditlev Denmark, 1967 Den Permanente Catalogue

Ditlev Coffee Pot

Ditlev Coffee Pot – photo via “modapple” etsy – listed as item “d” in the catalogue page above.

Ditlev Denmark, 1967 Den Permanente Catalogue

Ditlev Denmark, 1967 Den Permanente Catalogue

Ditlev Denmark - Small bowl or Ashtray

Small red bowl, or ashtray – appearing in the catalogue entry above in 3 sizes.

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Den Permanente, Copenhagen

Den Permanente, Copenhagen

Den Permanente was a very important and relevant Danish Design & Craft store in Copenhagen which operated from the 1930s to the late 1980s. It is particularly relevant to this site as many of the Potters written about here exhibited and sold work at Den Permanente.

The idea for the store was that of Kay Bojesen, a Danish silversmith – but probably today best known for his wooden monkey design. It became a commercial reality when the idea was developed by Christian Grauballe, director of Holmegaard in 1931.

Den Permanente operated as a “Permanent Exhibition of Danish Arts” and promoted the very best in modern Danish design and craft. A large range of objects were sold including furniture, glassware, lighting, ceramics, jewellery and textiles.

Den Permanente, Copenhagen

Den Permanente, Copenhagen, Photographer J.C. Raulston 1972

Items for exhibition and/or sale were chosen after  being assessed by a “Jury” and the managing board. There is a fascinating explanation of the process and more written in 1965 by its director Esbjorn Hoirt which can be read HERE

The store was important not only in Denmark for promoting Danish Design, but world wide. Den Permanente took part in several international exhibitions including the Milan Triennales of 1951-1960;  a 1954-1957 exhibition in the U.S. called “Design in Scandinavia” ; “Formes Scandinaves” in Paris 1958; Neue Form aus Denmark Germany/Austria 1957; and “Arts of Denmark” in the U.S. 1960-61.

It is fascinating to be able to read old catalogues from Den Permanente, and the Royal Danish Library in its fascinating Digital Collections has several Den Permanente catalogues which are well worth looking through. Many of the Danish Ceramicists written about on this site have work in the Catalogues. It is fascinating to see works by people such as Bjorn Wiinblad, Ditlev, Helle Allpass, Palshus and many many more.

There don’t seem to be many photographs of the actual store online, but there are several in the archives of the JC Raulston Arboretum at NC State University, United States, which is where the first 4 images are from.

 

 

Den Permanente, Copenhagen

Den Permanente, Copenhagen, Photographer J.C. Raulston 1972

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Bjorn Wiinblad – Part 3: Own Studio//Vaerksted

Bjorn Wiinblad Part 3: Own Studio work (Vaerksted).

Number 3 of a 3 part series summarising Wiinblad’s career as a ceramic designer.

I think some of the most impressive work by Wiinblad comes from his work in his own studio,  “Værksted”  which started in 1952 in Copenhagen. Generally they are “fajance” ware – eathernware pieces with a white base glaze on which a coloured design is hand painted. Wiinblad designed all of the pieces from his studio, and painted many of them himself – but had also help of up to 3 skilled painters to paint his designs onto the forms to keep up with the volume produced.

Bjorn Wiinlbad - Group of Studio Pieces

Bjorn Wiinlbad – Group of Studio Pieces

Wiinblad’s designs from his own “Vaerksted” often featured whimsical characters, sometimes in quite bizarre costumes and headgear – in the forms of lady-head vases, figurines, sculptures, candlesticks, and jars. Read more